[The Canadian Defense Industry in the New Global Environment]

Article excerpt

In this book, Edgar and Haglund attempt to enlighten readers with regard to 'problems and prospects' in our changing times. The issue deserves much more than the 145 pages of text that the authors give it. A scant 84 pages, comprising the second section, are devoted specifically to the domestic context. Considering the number of issues, such as the move away from domestic development and production of major systems, the licensed production of foreign developed systems, or the strategic implications of dependence upon foreign suppliers and developers, one would expect the book to be larger and to devote more space to the domestic defence industry. While the book may be viewed as an acceptable overview of defence procurement and production in the North Atlantic triangle, it encounters serious problems in its first section, 'The international context.' Of key concern is the authors' approach to the current international security system. It would appear that they are content to state that the major change in global security was the end of the Cold War and the concomitant significant reduction of the likelihood of a major conventional war in Western Europe. There is insufficient examination of the destabilizing effects that this event had upon the world. This conception of the impact of the end of the Cold War appears to influence their view that the threats to security come primarily from conventional/traditional sources. There is only passing reference to 'nontraditional' security issues and no discussion of the necessity to re-orient strategy and equipment to deal with the smaller scale wars that some believe will dominate the near future. One would also expect that in a book on the Canadian defence industry in a changing global environment, more attention would be paid to producers and markets outside of the North Atlantic triangle. …