New Frontiers in American Episcopal History

Article excerpt

Last summer, 2001, the editorial office sent out sixty letters to members of the board of directors of the Historical Society, to the editorial board, and to others who have been writing the history of the Episcopal Church. In early October, the letter was followed up by a "Reminder" to the dilatory. As a result we received seventeen responses or twenty-eight percent of the number of original letters sent out. If enough additional suggestions accumulate, we will publish them as well at a future date.

The suggestions for fresh areas of historical investigation in Episcopal Church history are listed alphabetically by authors. Either e-mail or postal service mail addresses-sometimes both-are given with permission. Those interested in following up on the suggested topics should contact the appropriate persons for any additional details. In making their recommendations, however, these men and women do not undertake to oversee or to serve as referees of the projects either in the research or writing stages.

The suggestions made by these historians vary greatly in length and subject matter. Some would embolden broad, fresh generalization; others seek to have specific subjects explored; still other suggest studies of related topics in larger series. Contributors were asked to limit themselves to two or three suggestions only. The scholars and their addresses are given first, followed by their recommendations.

Editor's Note

Henry W. Bowden

P.O. Box 8517

Red Bank, N.J. 07701

ASCHNOFF@aol.com

1. Women's ordination. We need a solid and thorough history of the ideas behind this movement, a chronology of when arguments were made, and especially who led various aspects of this movement. The best coverage would include both those prominent in furthering this development, those who opposed it, and those who mediated the subsequent adjustment.

2. Episcopal monasticism. We know a bit about nineteenthcentury beginnings of our few denominational orders, but what has happened throughout the twentieth century? Who emerged as leaders, in what capacities, in what directions? What of the future? Is there vigor, growth, and promise or is there atrophy, gentrification, and decline into marginality?

3. Pastoral care in health facilities. When did Episcopal ministerial training begin to include hospitals as a venue for pastoral activities? As a study of divinity school curricula and as a part of tracing a greater appreciation of where and how ministerial counsel and comfort can be applied, it would be good to have a comprehensive survey of this complex field.

David Chesebrough

Department of History

334 Schroeder Hall

Illinois State University

Normal, Illinois

An essay should be undertaken describing the recent history of the Evangelical wing of the Episcopal Church. What specifically does that wing stand for today. Who represents it and what influence does it have in the Church?

Vine Deloria, Jr.

3170 HowellRoad

Golden, Colorado 80401

vine@colorado.edu

1. A biographical series on the missionary bishops of the nineteenth century.

2. A series on the Episcopal independent schools, their founding, success, and current status.

3. A series on the various cathedrals of the church, location, history, and notable activities.

David Hein

Hein@Hood.edu

1. Austin Farrer (1904-1968) Look at his life and thought in relation to other figures in twentieth-century Anglican theology; a book-length critical biography is needed. The Farrer Papers are at the University of Oxford.

2. Radical orthodoxy and recent Anglican theology. The historian should provide a historical analysis of radical orthodoxy in relation to other movements in twentieth-century theology and philosophy. University of Virginia.

3. Well-researched, up-to-date book-length biographies are needed of the following two important but neglected bishops Henry Benjamin Whipple (Minnesota) and Henry Si. …