Integrated Advanced Information Management Systems: A Twenty-Year History at the University of Cincinnati*

Article excerpt

The University of Cincinnati (UC) has been active in the National Library of Medicine's Integrated Advanced Information Management Systems (IAIMS) program since IAIMS' inception in 1984. UC received IAIMS planning and modeling grants in the 1980s, spent the 1990s practicing its own form of "iaims" and refining its vision, and, in May 2003, received an IAIMS operations grant in the first round of awards under "the next generation" program. This paper discusses the history of IAIMS at UC and describes the goals, methods, and strategies of the current IAIMS program. The goal of UC's IAIMS program are to: improve teaching effectiveness by improving the assessment of health professional students and residents in laboratory and clinical teaching and learning environments; improve the ability of researchers, educators, and students to acquire and apply the knowledge required to be more productive in genomic research and education; and increase the productivity of research and administrators in the pre-award, post-award, and compliance phases of the research lifecycle.

INTRODUCTION

The University of Cincinnati (UC) Medical Center campus is home to the colleges of medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and allied health sciences. Academic Information Technology and Libraries (AIT&L) supports these colleges, providing a full suite of library services, training and education services, instructional technology support, desktop computer support, server and security support, Website development, and administrative, academic, and research systems development. The University of Cincinnati Office of Information Technology (UCit) planned, installed, and maintains the university's gigabit network for data, voice, and university email systems; negotiates institutional licenses for hardware and software; develops and maintains university-wide administrative systems; provides technology support and training for employees and students; and, in partnership with academic units, provides information policy leadership.

UC has been active in the National Library of Medicine's Integrated Advanced Information Management Systems (IAIMS) program since its inception in 1984. UC received IAIMS planning and modeling grants in the 1980s, spent the 1990s practicing its own form of "iaims" and refining its vision, and, in May 2003, received an IAIMS operations grant in the first round of awards under "the next generation" program. The goals of the current, funded IAIMS program are to improve teaching effectiveness, improve the application of knowledge in genomic research, and increase the productivity of researchers.

BACKGROUND

1984-1991

The UC Medical Center embarked on an IAIMS preplanning process, led by Nancy Lorenzi, that resulted in the award of an IAIMS planning grant in 1984. With that grant (1984-1986), the medical center completed a strategic information management planning process. The first IAIMS strategic plan was published in 1986 shortly after Donald C. Harrison was appointed the senior vice president and provost for health affairs. In 1987, the medical center received an IAIMS modeling grant, for which Gregory W. Rouan, professor and associate chair for medical education, Department of Internal Medicine, and president of the Health Alliance of Greater Cincinnati's physicians organization, was clinical director. Also in 1987, John J. Hutton became dean of the College of Medicine and joined Dr. Harrison in supporting the IAIMS initiative. They brought with them a keen sense of the importance of information technology to academic medical centers and a strong belief that information technology was a strategic investment for the future of the UC Medical Center. From 1987 to 1990, IAIMS modeling efforts focused on the development of a clinician's workstation prototype. The UC Medical Center was not funded for IAIMS implementation grants in 1990 and 1991.

1992-2000

During the early 1990s, the UC Medical Center underwent tremendous organizational change and unprecedented growth. …