John Ford (English Dramatist)

John Ford, 1586–c.1640, English dramatist, b. Devonshire. He went to London to study law but was never called to the bar. The early part of his playwriting career was taken up with collaborations, primarily with Dekker. His three major tragedies, 'Tis Pity She's a Whore,The Broken Heart, and Love's Sacrifice, and a historical play, Perkin Warbeck appeared between 1627 and 1634. Ford was the most important playwright during the reign of Charles I. His plays are characterized by a sympathetic treatment of thwarted love, and they stress the conflict between the power of human passion and the laws of conscience and society. They are intense, melancholy, and violent, often revealing his interest in abnormal psychology and taboo subjects—'Tis Pity She's a Whore deals with incest.

See biography by D. K. Anderson (1972); studies by M. Stavig (1968), F. Ali (1974), and D. Anderson (1986).

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2014, The Columbia University Press.

Selected full-text books and articles on this topic

John Ford and the Drama of His Time
Clifford Leech.
Chatto and Windus, 1957
The Lover's Melancholy; The Broken Heart; 'Tis Pity She's a Whore; Perkin Warbeck
Marion Lomax; John Ford.
Oxford University Press, 1995
Counterfeiting Shakespeare: Evidence, Authorship, and John Ford's Funerall Elegye
Brian Vickers.
Cambridge University Press, 2002
Shakespeare's Contemporaries: Modern Studies in English Renaissance Drama
Max Bluestone; Norman Rabkin.
Prentice-Hall, 1961
Librarian’s tip: "John Ford: The Last Jacobean Tragedy" begins on p. 282
Studies in the English Renaissance Drama
Josephine W. Bennett; Oscar Cargill; Vernon Hall Jr.
New York University Press, 1959
Librarian’s tip: "The Mystery of Perkin Warbeck" begins on p. 125
An Introduction to Stuart Drama
Frederick S. Boas.
Oxford University Press, 1946
Librarian’s tip: Chap. XIV "John Ford: Tragedies of Melancholy"
Touching Touchets: Perkin Warbeck and the Buggery Statute
Hopkins, Lisa.
Renaissance Quarterly, Vol. 52, No. 2, Summer 1999
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
The Adaptation of a Shakespearean Genre: 'Othello' and Ford's 'Tis Pity She's a Whore.'
Powell, Raymond.
Renaissance Quarterly, Vol. 48, No. 3, Autumn 1995
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
"This Idol Thou Ador'st": The Iconography of 'Tis Pity She's a Whore.' (John Ford)
Amtower, Laurel.
Papers on Language & Literature, Vol. 34, No. 2, Spring 1998
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Monarchy and Incest in Renaissance England: Literature, Culture, Kinship, and Kingship
Bruce Thomas Boehrer.
University of Pennsylvania Press, 1992
Librarian’s tip: "John Ford's Tremulous Private Heaven" begins on p. 121
Issues of Death: Mortality and Identity in English Renaissance Tragedy
Michael Neill.
Clarendon Press, 1998
Librarian’s tip: Discussion of John Ford begins on p. 354
The Age of Milton: An Encyclopedia of Major 17th-Century British and American Authors
Alan Hager.
Greenwood Press, 2004
Librarian’s tip: Discussion of John Ford begins on p. 139
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