The Chronicles of Narnia

Lewis, C. S.

C. S. Lewis: (Clive Staples Lewis), 1898–1963, English author, b. Belfast, Ireland. A fellow and tutor of English at Magdalen College, Oxford, from 1925 to 1954, C. S. Lewis was noted equally for his literary scholarship and for his intellectual and witty expositions of Christian tenets. Among his most important works are The Allegory of Love (1936), an analysis of the literary evolution of romantic love during the Middle Ages; The Screwtape Letters (1942, rev. ed. 1961), an ironic treatment of the theme of salvation; and a history of English Literature in the Sixteenth Century (1954). He is also the author of Out of the Silent Planet (1938) and That Hideous Strength (1945), outer-planetary fantasies with deep Catholic and moral overtones; the "Chronicles of Narnia," a series of allegorical fantasies set in the mythical kingdom of Narnia, including The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (1950) and The Silver Chair (1953); many works of literary criticism, including Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature (1966); and the autobiographical Surprised by Joy (1954). From 1954 until his death he was professor of Medieval and Renaissance English at Cambridge.

See his Selected Literary Essays (1970) and Narrative Poems (1970), both ed. by W. Hooper; his letters, ed. by his brother W. H. Lewis (1966, repr. 1975); biographies by C. S. Kilby and D. Gilbert (1973), and R. L. Green and W. Hooper (1974); studies by P. G. Schakel, ed. (1977), W. Griffin (1986), C. N. Manlove (1987), L. W. Dorsett (1988), and G. B. Sayer (1988); R. MacSwain and M. Ward, ed., The Cambridge Companion to C. S. Lewis (2010).

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2014, The Columbia University Press.

Selected full-text books and articles on this topic

The Way into Narnia: A Reader's Guide
Peter J. Schakel.
William B. Eerdmans, 2005
The Chronicles of Narnia and Philosophy: The Lion, the Witch, and the Worldview
Gregory Bassham; Jerry L. Walls.
Open Court, 2005
Imagination and the Arts in C.S. Lewis: Journeying to Narnia and Other Worlds
Peter J. Schakel.
University of Missouri Press, 2002
Tending the Heart of Virtue: How Classic Stories Awaken a Child's Moral Imagination
Vigen Guroian.
Oxford University Press, 1998
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 5 "Evil and Redemption in The Snow Queen and The Lion, Witch, and the Wardrobe"
Shadows of Imagination: The Fantasies of C. S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien, and Charles Williams
Mark R. Hillegas.
Southern Illinois University Press, 1979 (New edition)
Other Worlds: The Fantasy Genre
John H. Timmerman.
Bowling Green University Popular Press, 1983
Librarian’s tip: "The Magician's Nephew: Mage and Maker" begins on p. 75
The Gospel According to Lewis. (Fantasia)
Nelson, Michael.
The American Prospect, Vol. 13, No. 4, February 25, 2002
C. S. Lewis in Context
Doris T. Myers.
Kent State University Press, 1994
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 4 "The Context of Christian Humanism"
Mindscapes: The Geographies of Imagined Worlds
George E. Slusser; Eric S. Rabkin.
Southern Illinois University Press, 1989
Librarian’s tip: Discussion of The Chronicles of Narnia begins on p. 236
The Natural History of Make-Believe: A Guide to the Principal Works of Britain, Europe, and America
John Goldthwaite.
Oxford University Press, 1996
Fantasy Literature for Children and Young Adults: An Annotated Bibliography
Ruth Nadelman Lynn.
R. R. Bowker, 1995 (4th edition)
The Oxford Companion to Children's Literature
Humphrey Carpenter; Mari Prichard.
Oxford University Press, 1999
Inside the Wardrobe: Is 'Narnia' a Christian Allegory?
Bell, Robert H.
Commonweal, Vol. 132, No. 22, December 16, 2005
Looking for a topic idea? Use Questia's Topic Generator