The Vampire in Literature

vampire

vampire, in folklore, animated corpse that sucks the blood of humans. Belief in vampires has existed from the earliest times and has given rise to an amalgam of legends and superstitions. They were most commonly thought of as spirits or demons that left their graves at night to seek and enslave their victims; it was thought that the victims themselves became vampires. The vampire could be warded off with a variety of charms, amulets, and herbs and could finally be killed by driving a stake through its heart or by cremation. Sometimes the vampire assumed a nonhuman shape, such as that of a bat or wolf (see lycanthropy). Probably the most famous vampire in literature is Count Dracula in the novel Dracula by Bram Stoker.

See A. Masters, The Natural History of the Vampire (1972); N. Auerbach, Our Vampires, Ourselves (1995).

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2014, The Columbia University Press.

Selected full-text books and articles on this topic

Attention, Predation, Counterintuition: Why Dracula Won't Die
Clasen, Mathias.
Style, Vol. 46, No. 3/4, Fall 2012
The Blood Is the Life: Vampires in Literature
Leonard G. Heldreth; Mary Pharr.
Bowling Green State University Popular Press, 1999
The Monster with a Thousand Faces: Guises of the Vampire in Myth and Literature
Brian J. Frost.
Bowling Green State University Popular Press, 1989
The Vampire in Nineteenth-Century English Literature
Carole A. Senf.
Bowling Green State University Popular Press, 1988
This Thing of Darkness: Perspectives on Evil and Human Wickedness
Richard Paul Hamilton; Margaret Sönser Breen.
Rodopi, 2004
Librarian’s tip: Chap. One "Twentieth-Century Vampire Literature: Intimations of Evil and Power"
Vampires: Myths and Metaphors of Enduring Evil
Peter Day.
Rodopi, 2006
Librarian’s tip: Includes multiple essays that discuss vampires in literature, including in the works of Bram Stoker, Sheridan Le Fanu, and Anne Rice
The Fantastic Vampire: Studies in the Children of the Night : Selected Essays from the Eighteenth International Conference on the Fantastic in the Arts
James Craig Holte.
Greenwood Press, 2002
Librarian’s tip: Especially Part One "Studies on Stoker" and Part Three "Modern Vampire Fictions"
The Gothic World of Stephen King: Landscape of Nightmares
Gary Hoppenstand; Ray B. Browne.
Bowling Green State University Popular Press, 1987
Librarian’s tip: "Blood, Eroticism, and the Vampire in Twentieth-Century Popular Literature" begins on p. 20
The Naked and the Undead: Evil and the Appeal of Horror
Cynthia A. Freeland.
Westview Press, 2000
Librarian’s tip: Chap. Four "Seductive Vampires"
Sweet Dreams: Sexuality, Gender, and Popular Fiction
Susannah Radstone.
Lawrence & Wishart, 1988
Librarian’s tip: "Children of the Night: Vampirism as Homosexuality, Homosexuality as Vampirism" begins on p. 47
Blood Ties: The Vampire Lover in the Popular Romance
Bailie, Helen T.
Journal of American Culture (Malden, MA), Vol. 34, No. 2, June 2011
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Victorian Literature and the Anorexic Body
Anna Krugovoy Silver.
Cambridge University Press, 2002
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 4 "Vampirism and the Anorexic Paradigm"
The Gothic World of Anne Rice
Gary Hoppenstand; Ray B. Browne.
Bowling Green State University Popular Press, 1996
How to Domesticate a Vampire: Gender, Blood Relations and Sexuality in Stephenie Meyer's Twilight
Nayar, Pramod.
Nebula, Vol. 7, No. 3, September 2010
Sins of the Blood: Rewriting the Family in Two Postmodern Vampire Novels
Greenberg, Louis.
Journal of Literary Studies, Vol. 26, No. 1, March 2010
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Dracula
Bram Stoker; Maud Ellmann.
Oxford University Press, 1998
The Vampyre, and Other Tales of the Macabre
Robert Morrison; Chris Baldick.
Oxford University Press, 1997
Librarian’s tip: Includes John Polidori's "The Vampyre"
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