Lydia Maria Child

Lydia Maria Child, 1802–80, American author and abolitionist, b. Lydia Maria Francis, Medford, Mass. She edited (1826–34) the Juvenile Miscellany, a children's periodical. She and her husband (David Lee Child, whom she married in 1828) were devoted to the antislavery cause; she wrote widely read pamphlets on the subject in addition to editing (1841–49) the National Anti-Slavery Standard, a New York City weekly newspaper. Selections from her Standard essays were published in 1999 as Letters from New-York. Other writings include several historical novels and a book on the history of religions. Her Frugal Housewife (1829) went through many editions.

See her letters (with introduction by J. G. Whittier, 1883, repr. 1970); biographies by H. G. Baer (1964), M. Meltzer (1965), W. S. Osborne (1980), D. P. Clifford (1992), and C. Karcher (1994).

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2014, The Columbia University Press.

Selected full-text books and articles on this topic

Lydia Maria Child: Editor of the National Anti-Slavery Standard, 1841-43
Watts, Liz.
Journalism History, Vol. 35, No. 1, Spring 2009
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
An Appeal in Favor of That Class of Americans Called Africans
Lydia Maria Child; Carolyn L. Karcher.
University of Massachusetts Press, 1996
The Artistry of Anger: Black and White Women's Literature in America, 1820-1860
Linda M. Grasso.
University of North Carolina Press, 2002
Librarian’s tip: Chap. Four "Anger, Exile, and Restitution in Lydia Maria Child's Hobomok"
Sentiment and Space in Lydia Maria Child's Native American Writings, 1824-1870
Mielke, Laura L.
Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers, Vol. 21, No. 2, June 2004
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
The "Tragic Mulatta" Revisited: Race and Nationalism in Nineteenth-Century Antislavery Fiction
Eve Allegra Raimon.
Rutgers University Press, 2004
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 1 "Of Romances and Republics in Lydia Maria Child's Miscegenation Fiction"
The Myth of Aunt Jemima: Representations of Race and Region
Diane Roberts.
Routledge, 1994
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 5 "Olla Podrida America: Lydia Maria Child and Radical Miscegenation"
"Your Sister Cannot Speak to You and Understand You as I Do": Native American Culture and Female Subjectivity in Lydia Maria Child and Catharine Maria Sedgwick
Vasquez, Mark G.
ATQ (The American Transcendental Quarterly), Vol. 15, No. 3, September 2001
Liberal Visions of Reconstruction: Lydia Maria Child's a Romance of the Republic and George Washington Cable's the Grandissimes
Piep, Karsten H.
Studies in American Fiction, Vol. 31, No. 2, Autumn 2003
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
The Political Work of Northern Women Writers and the Civil War, 1850-1872
Lyde Cullen Sizer.
University of North Carolina Press, 2000
Librarian’s tip: "New England Mothers: Introducing Child, Stowe, and Fern" begins on p. 32 and "Child versus Wise and Mason: Speaking for the North" begins on p. 61
"But Maria, Did You Really Write This?": Preface as Cover Story in Lydia Maria Child's Hobomok
Vaux, Molly.
Legacy: A Journal of American Women Writers, Vol. 17, No. 2, June 2000
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
A Quilt for Life: Lydia Maria Child's the American Frugal Housewife
Hoeller, Hildegard.
ATQ (The American Transcendental Quarterly), Vol. 13, No. 2, June 1999
Women during the Civil War: An Encyclopedia
Judith E. Harper.
Routledge, 2003
Librarian’s tip: "Child, Lydia Maria (1802-1880)" begins on p. 74
Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers: A Bio-Bibliographical Critical Sourcebook
Denise D. Knight.
Greenwood Press, 1997
Librarian’s tip: "Lydia Maria Child (1802-1880)" begins on p. 42
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