John Jay Chapman

John Jay Chapman, 1862–1933, American essayist and poet, b. New York City, grad. Harvard, 1885. He was admitted to the bar in 1888, but after 10 years abandoned law for literature. Active in the anti-Tammany reform movement in the 1890s, Chapman was an active supporter of civil rights, and a fiery and pertinent observer of politics. Among his works are Emerson and Other Essays (1898), Memories and Milestones (1915), Songs and Poems (1919), and New Horizons in American Life (1932). He also wrote several plays, including The Treason and Death of Benedict Arnold (1910).

See his selected writings ed. by J. Barzun (1968); studies by R. B. Hovey (1959) and M. H. Bernstein (1964).

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2013, The Columbia University Press.

Selected full-text books and articles on this topic

John Jay Chapman: An American Mind
Richard B. Hovey.
Columbia University Press, 1959
FREE! Emerson: And Other Essays
John Jay Chapman.
C. Scribner's Sons, 1898
Lucian, Plato and Greek Morals
John Jay Chapman.
Houghton Mifflin Company, 1931
Letters and Religion
John Jay Chapman.
The Atlantic Monthly Press, 1924
American Radicals Some Problems and Personalities
Harvey Goldberg.
Monthly Review Press, 1957
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 1 "John Jay Chapman and the Insurgent Individual"
Contemporaries
Alfred Kazin.
Little, Brown, 1962
Librarian’s tip: "John Jay Chapman: A Leftover Transcendentalist" begins on p. 64
Invisible Giants: Fifty Americans Who Shaped the Nation but Missed the History Books
Mark Carnes.
Oxford University Press, 2003
Librarian’s tip: "John Jay Chapman" begins on p. 47
American Orators of the Twentieth Century: Critical Studies and Sources
Bernard K. Duffy; Halford R. Ryan.
Greenwood Press, 1987
Librarian’s tip: "John Jay Chapman (1862-1933), Socratic Gadfly" begins on p. 49
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