V. S. Naipaul

V. S. Naipaul: (Sir Vidiadhar Surajprasad Naipaul) (nīpôl´), 1932–, English author, b. Chaguanas, Trinidad; grad. University College, Oxford, 1953. Naipul, whose family is descended from Indian Brahmins, has lived in England since 1950. A master of English prose style, he is known for his penetrating analyses of alienation and exile. In fiction and essays marked by stylistic virtuosity and psychological insight, he often focuses on his childhood and his travels beyond Trinidad. Writing with increasing irony and pessimism, he has often bleakly detailed the dual problems of the Third World: the oppressions of colonialism and the chaos of postcolonialism.

Among Naipaul's works of international analysis are The Middle Passage (1962), about the West Indies and South America; an Indian trilogy: An Area of Darkness (1964), India: A Wounded Civilization (1977), and India: A Million Mutinies Now (1990); and The Masque of Africa (2010), on indigenous religions in several African nations. His novels include The Mystic Masseur (1957), A House for Mr. Biswas (1961), In a Free State (1971; Booker Prize), Guerrillas (1975), A Bend in the River (1979), and Half a Life (2001) and its sequel, Magic Seeds (2004); he has also written numerous short stories. Among his other works are The Enigma of Arrival (1987), A Way in the World (1994), and A Writer's People (2008), autobiographical works combining novel, memoir, and history; Among the Believers (1981) and Beyond Belief (1998), analyses of modern Islam; and many political essays, a representative sample of which are collected in The Writer and the World (2002). Naipaul was knighted in 1990 and awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 2001.

See his early letters in Between Father and Son: Family Letters (2000), ed. by G. Aitken; F. Jussawalla, ed., Conversations with V. S. Naipaul (1997); biographies by R. D. Hamner (1973), R. Kelly (1989), and P. French (2008); studies by P. Theroux (1972 and 1998), R. D. Hamner, ed. (1979), P. Nightingale (1987), P. Hughes (1988), T. F. Weiss (1992), W. Dissanayake (1993), B. A. King (1993), J. Levy (1995), F. Mustafa (1995), R. Nixon (1997), N. Ramadevi (1997), A. J. Khan (1998), L. Feder (2001), H. Hayward (2002), and B. King (2003).

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2014, The Columbia University Press.

Selected full-text books and articles on this topic

V.S. Naipaul and the West Indies
Dolly Zulakha Hassan.
Peter Lang, 1989
After Empire: Scott, Naipaul, Rushdie
Michael Gorra.
University of Chicago Press, 1997
Reworlding: The Literature of the Indian Diaspora
Emmanuel S. Nelson.
Greenwood Press, 1992
Librarian’s tip: Includes "V. S. Naipaul: History as Cosmic Irony," "Voice in Exile: 'Journey' in Raja Rao and V. S. Naipaul," and more
Atrocity and Amnesia: The Political Novel since 1945
Robert Boyers.
Oxford University Press, 1987
The Forged Feature: Toward a Poetics of Uncertainty: New and Selected Essays
Ben Belitt.
Fordham University Press, 1995
Librarian’s tip: Includes "The Heraldry of Accommodation: A House for Mr. Naipaul"
Anger and the Alchemy of Literary Method in V. S. Naipaul's Political Fiction: The Case of the Mimic Men
Greenberg, Robert M.
Twentieth Century Literature, Vol. 46, No. 2, Summer 2000
Deconstruction, Imperialism and the West Indian Novel
Glyne A. Griffith.
University of the West Indies Press, 1996
Librarian’s tip: Includes "Metaphysics and Materialism: Wilson Harris and V. S. Naipaul"
An Artificial Wilderness: Essays on 20th-Century Literature
Sven Birkerts.
David R. Godine, 1990
Passion and Paradox: Intellectuals Confront the National Question
Joan Cocks.
Princeton University Press, 2002
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 6 "Cosmopolitanism in a New Key: V. S. Naipaul and Edward Said"
Fifty Caribbean Writers: A Bio-Bibliographical Critical Sourcebook
Daryl Cumber Dance.
Greenwood Press, 1986
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