Alejo Carpentier

Alejo Carpentier (älā´hō kärpĕntyār´), 1904–80, Cuban novelist and musicologist. As a political exile in Paris between 1928 and 1939, Carpentier was strongly influenced by Antonin Artaud, Jacques Prévert, and the surrealists. Reflecting his deep commitment to revolutionary politics, his novels explore the irrational elements of the Latin American world, its rich variety of cultures, and the possibility of its magical transformation. Widely regarded as one of the greatest modern Latin American writers, Carpentier was also important as a theorist of the region's literature and historian of its music. Among his works are Ecue-Yamba-O (1933), The Lost Steps (1953; tr. 1956), The Chase (1956; tr. 1989), The Kingdom of This World (1949, tr. 1957), The War of Time (1963, tr. 1970), Reasons of State (1974; tr. 1976), and The Harp and the Shadow (1979; tr. 1990).

See studies by M. Adams (1975), F. Janney (1981), D. Shaw (1985), and R. Echevarriá (1977, rev. ed. 1990).

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2014, The Columbia University Press.

Selected full-text books and articles on this topic

The Logic of Fetishism: Alejo Carpentier and the Cuban Tradition
James J. Pancrazio.
Bucknell University Press, 2004
Tropics of History: Cuba Imagined
Alan West.
Bergin & Garvey, 1997
Librarian’s tip: Chap. Two "Alejo Carpentier: Symphonist of History's Emblems"
Atrocity and Amnesia: The Political Novel since 1945
Robert Boyers.
Oxford University Press, 1987
Librarian’s tip: Discussion of Alejo Carpentier begins on p. 83
Oedipal and Prodigal Returns in Alejo Carpentier and William Faulkner(*)
Handley, George B.
The Mississippi Quarterly, Vol. 52, No. 3, Summer 1999
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Postcolonial Perspectives on the Cultures of Latin America and Lusophone Africa
Robin Fiddian.
Liverpool University Press, 2000
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 7 "Caribbean Masks: Frantz Fanon and Alejo Carpentier"
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