Ann Radcliffe

Radcliffe, Ann (Ward)

Ann (Ward) Radcliffe, 1764–1823, English novelist, b. London. The daughter of a successful tradesman, she married William Radcliffe, a law student who later became editor of the English Chronicle. Her best works, The Romance of the Forest (1791), The Mysteries of Udolpho (1794), and The Italian (1797), give her a prominent place in the tradition of the Gothic romance. Her excellent use of landscape to create mood and her sense of mystery and suspense had an enormous influence on later writers, particularly Walter Scott.

See studies by C. F. McIntyre (1920, repr. 1970) and E. B. Murray (1972).

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2014, The Columbia University Press.

Selected full-text books and articles on this topic

The Romance of the Forest
Ann Radcliffe; Chloe Chard.
Oxford University Press, 1999
Women Writers and the English Nation in the 1790s: Romantic Belongings
Angela Keane.
Cambridge University Press, 2000
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 2 "Domesticating the Sublime: Ann Radcliffe and Gothic Dissent"
The Failure of Gothic: Problems of Disjunction in An Eighteenth-Century Literary Form
Elizabeth R. Napier.
Clarendon Press, 1987
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 4 "Attractive Persecution: The Mysteries of Udolpho"
Deconstructing the Patriarchal Palace: Ann Radcliffe's Poetry in 'The Mysteries of Udolpho.'
Arnold, Ellen.
Women and Language, Vol. 19, No. 2, Fall 1996
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Gothic Utopia: Heretical Sanctuary in Ann Radcliffe's the Italian
Tooley, Brenda.
Utopian Studies, Vol. 11, No. 2, Spring 2000
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Contesting the Gothic: Fiction, Genre, and Cultural Conflict, 1764-1832
James Watt.
Cambridge University Press, 1999
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 4 "The First Poetess of Romantic Fiction: Ann Radcliffe"
Eighteenth-Century Fiction and the Law of Property
Wolfram Schmidgen.
Cambridge University Press, 2002
Librarian’s tip: Chap. Five "Ann Radcliffe and the Political Economy of Gothic Space"
Religion, Toleration, and British Writing, 1790-1830
Mark Canuel.
Cambridge University Press, 2002
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 2 "Holy 'Hypocrisy' and the Rule of Belief: Radcliffe's Gothics"
Ann Radcliffe's Gothic Narrative and the Readers at Home
Mackenzie, Scott.
Studies in the Novel, Vol. 31, No. 4, Winter 1999
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Ann Radcliffe and Natural Theology
Chandler, Anne.
Studies in the Novel, Vol. 38, No. 2, Summer 2006
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Women, Revolution, and the Novels of the 1790s
Linda Lang-Peralta.
Michigan State University Press, 1999
Librarian’s tip: "Radcliffe, Godwin, and Self-Possession in the 1790s" begins on p. 89
Gothic Writers: A Critical and Bibliographical Guide
Douglass H. Thomson; Jack G. Voller; Frederick S. Frank.
Greenwood Press, 2002
Librarian’s tip: "Ann Radcliffe (1764-1823)" begins on p. 349
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