Jamaica Kincaid

Jamaica Kincaid, 1949–, West Indian–American writer, b. Antigua as Elaine Potter Richardson. She immigrated to the United States at 16 and later became a U.S. citizen. Changing her name (1973), she became a New Yorker staff writer in 1976, working there until 1996. Kincaid first became known for her lush tales of Caribbean life—in her first short-story collection, At the Bottom of the River (1983), and in Annie John (1985), a semiautobiographical series of related stories that explore the complexity of mother-daughter connections. Her later fiction continues the style and themes of these works. Dark and personal, they often feature clear-eyed yet lyrical portraits of everyday reality in the postcolonial West Indies. Her novels include Lucy (1990), The Autobiography of My Mother (1996), Mr. Potter (2002), and the stream-of-consciousness, apparently semiautobiographical dissection of a marriage's dissolution, See Now Then (2013). Kincaid has also written nonfiction, notably A Small Place (1988), a long and angry essay on Antigua, and My Brother (1997), an incantatory memoir of her brother's death from AIDS. An enthusiastic and knowledgeable gardener, she is also the author of many essays on the subject and of My Garden (Book) (1999).

See studies by M. Ferguson (1994), D. Simmons (1994), H. Bloom, ed. (1998), L. Paravisini-Gebert (1999), L. Golmore (2000), and S. A. J. Alexander (2002).

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2014, The Columbia University Press.

Selected full-text books and articles on this topic

Jamaica Kincaid: A Critical Companion
Lizabeth Paravisini-Gebert.
Greenwood Press, 1999
Face to Face: Interviews with Contemporary Novelists
Allan Vorda.
Rice University Press, 1993
Librarian’s tip: "I Come from a Place That's Very Unreal: An Interview with Jamaica Kincaid" begins on p. 77
Snapshots: 20th Century Mother-Daughter Fiction
Joyce Carol Oates; Janet Berliner.
David R. Godine, 2000
Librarian’s tip: "Girl" by Jamaica Kincaid begins on p. 95
Understanding Jamaica Kincaid's Annie John: A Student Casebook to Issues, Sources, and Historical Documents
Deborah Mistron.
Greenwood Press, 1999
Winds of Change: The Transforming Voices of Caribbean Women Writers and Scholars
Adele S. Newson; Linda Strong-Leek.
Peter Lang, 1998
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 4 "Caribbean Writers and Caribbean Language: A Study of Jamaica Kincaid's Annie John"
Arms Akimbo: Africana Women in Contemporary Literature
Janice Lee Liddell; Yakini Belinda Kemp.
University Press of Florida, 1999
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 7 "Snapshots of Childhood Life in Jamaica Kincaid's Fiction"
The Immigrant Experience in North American Literature: Carving out a Niche
Katherine B. Payant; Toby Rose.
Greenwood Press, 1999
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 5 "Developing Negatives: Jamaica Kincaid's Lucy"
The Garden and the World: Jamaica Kincaid and the Cultural Borders of Ecocriticism
O'Brien, Susie.
Mosaic (Winnipeg), Vol. 35, No. 2, June 2002
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Jamaica Kincaid and the Canon: In Dialogue with "Paradise Lost" and "Jane Eyre."(West Indian Writer; British Novels)
Simmons, Diane.
MELUS, Vol. 23, No. 2, Summer 1998
PEER-REVIEWED PERIODICAL
Peer-reviewed publications on Questia are publications containing articles which were subject to evaluation for accuracy and substance by professional peers of the article's author(s).
Fifty Caribbean Writers: A Bio-Bibliographical Critical Sourcebook
Daryl Cumber Dance.
Greenwood Press, 1986
Librarian’s tip: "Jamaica Kincaid (1949-)" begins on p. 255
A Reader's Companion to the Short Story in English
Erin Fallon; R. C. Feddersen; James Kurtzleben; Maurice A. Lee; Susan Rochette-Crawley.
Greenwood Press, 2001
Librarian’s tip: "Jamaica Kincaid (May 25, 1949-)" begins on p. 225
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