Max Reinhardt

Max Reinhardt, 1873–1943, Austrian theatrical producer and director, originally named Max Goldmann. After acting under Otto Brahm at the Deutsches Theater in Berlin, he managed (1902–5) his own theater, where he produced more than 50 plays. He was director of the Deutsches Theater after 1905 and of the smaller Kammerspiele, which he built in 1906. Reinhardt often used the entire auditorium for a production, seeking to bridge the gap between actor and audience by placing the spectator within the action. He staged gigantic productions, full of pageantry and color, and was especially noted for his direction of mob scenes. His settings, which incorporated the ideas of Appia and Craig, were masterfully executed. Among his world-famous productions were The Lower Depths,A Midsummer Night's Dream,Faust,Oedipus Rex, and The Miracle. He was also one of the first to stage the plays of the expressionists after World War I. In 1919 he opened an enormous arena theater, the Grosses Schauspielhaus ( "Theatre of the Five Thousand" ), and in 1920 he was among the founders of the Salzburg Festival, where he annually staged Everyman with the Austrian Alps as his backdrop. In 1933 he was forced by the Nazis to flee Germany. In the United States he directed a movie version of A Midsummer Night's Dream (1935) and a stage pageant with music by Kurt Weill, The Eternal Road (1934, produced 1937). He became a U.S. citizen in 1940.

See H. Carter, The Theatre of Max Reinhardt (1914, repr. 1964); J. L. Styan, Max Reinhardt (1982).

The Columbia Encyclopedia, 6th ed. Copyright© 2014, The Columbia University Press.

Selected full-text books and articles on this topic

The Theatre of Max Reinhardt
Huntly Carter.
Benjamin Blom, 1964
Max Reinhardt and His Theatre
Oliver M. Sayler; Mariele S. Gudernatsch.
Brentano's, 1924
The Director and the Stage: From Naturalism to Grotowski
Edward Braun.
Holmes & Meier, 1982
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 7 "Max Reinhardt in Germany and Austria"
The Theatre of the Weimar Republic
John Willett.
Holmes & Meier, 1988
Librarian’s tip: Chap. 3 "Reinhardt, the Bridge to the 1920s"
Directors on Directing: A Source Book of the Modern Theater
Toby Cole; Helen Krich Chinoy.
Bobbs-Merrill, 1963 (Revised edition)
Librarian’s tip: "Max Reinhardt (1873-1943)" begins on p. 296
Theatrical Directors: A Biographical Dictionary
John W. Frick; Stephen M. Vallillo.
Greenwood, 1994
Librarian’s tip: "Max Reinhardt" begins on p. 331
Twentieth-Century German Literature
Harry T. Moore.
Basic Books, 1967
Librarian’s tip: Discussion of Max Reinhardt begins on p. 21
Looking for a topic idea? Use Questia's Topic Generator