The Review of Metaphysics

Founded in 1947, the Review of Metaphysics is a quarterly journal published by the Philosophy Education Society of the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. Its subject matter covers trade, technical and professional publications; philosophy; indexes, abstracts, reports, proceedings and bibliographies. Kenneth Rolling is the managing editor, Dr. Jude P. Dougherty is the editor and Justin West is the book review editor.

Articles from Vol. 59, No. 2, December

American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly: Vol. 79, No. 3, Summer 2005
Aquinas and the Human Desire for Knowledge, JAN A. AERTSEN This essay examines Aquinas's analysis of the human desire to know, which plays a central role in his thought. (I) This analysis confronts him with the Aristotelian tradition: thus, the...
Australasian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 83, No. 3, September 2005
Moral Fictionalism versus 'The Rest', DANIEL NOLAN, GREG RESTALL, and CAROLINE WEST In this paper a distinct methaithical position is introduced: fictionalism about morality. This position is clarified and defended, showing that it is a way to save...
Edward Pols (1919-2005)
Edward Pols died on 14 August 2005, in Brunswick, Maine, within weeks of completing his volume of philosophical essays, On Rational Agency, and his volume of poetry, Remembrance of Things to Come. That his life ended in active engagement with both...
International Philosophical Quarterly: Vol. 45, No. 4, December 2005
Praxis of the Middle: Self and No-Self in Early Buddhism, JOHN W. M. KRUMMEL This paper considers the controversy surrounding the Buddhist doctrine of ino-selfi (anatt, an, tman), and especially the question of whether the Buddha himself meant by...
Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 102, No. 6, June 2005
A Plea For Things That Aren't Quite All There (Or, Is There a Problem about Vague Composition and Vague Existence?), NICHOLAS J. J. SMITH Orthodoxy has it that mereological composition can never be a vague matter, for if it were, then existence...
Journal of the History of Philosophy: Vol. 44, No. 1, January 2006
Hume on Promises and the Peculiar Act of the Mind, RACHEL COHON Hume's account of the virtue of fidelity to promises contains two surprising claims: (1) Any analysis of fidelity that treats it as a natural (nonconventional) virtue is incorrect because...
Philosophy and Phenomenological Research: Vol. 70, No. 2, March 2006
Perception and Representation, WILLIAM ALSTON Alston opposes the popular view that the phenomenal character of perceptual experience consists in the subject's representing the (putative) perceived object as being so-and-so. The account of perceptual...
Philosophy: Vol. 80, No. 3, July 2005
Almog's Descartes, FRED ABLONDI The answer which Joseph Almog gives to the question which serves as the title of his recent book What Am I? (subtitled: Descartes and the Mind-Body Problem) is based upon his interpretation of and objection to (1)...
Phronesis as Poetic: Moral Creativity in Contemporary Aristotelianism
IN BOOK 6 OF HIS NICOMACHEAN ETHICS, Aristotle distinguishes phronesis or "practical wisdom" from poiesis or "art," "production." Neither deals with the universals of pure science or theoretical wisdom but rather with "things which admit of being other...
Phronesis: Vol. 50, No. 3, July 2005
Aristotle and the Aristotelian Tradition, KEIMPE ALGRA La figure d'Ulysse chez les Socratiques : Socrate polutropos, DAVID LEVYSTONE At the end of the fifth century B.C.E., the character of Odysseus was scorned by most of the Athenians: he illustrated...
Phronesis: Vol. 50, No. 4, October 2005
Recollection and Philosophical Reflection in Plato's "Phaedo", LEE FRANKLIN Interpretations of recollection in the Phaedo are divided between ordinary interpretations, on which recollection explains a kind of learning accomplished by all, and sophisticated...
Potentiality, Creativity, and Relationality: Creative Power as a "New" Transcendental?
TO SUGGEST AN ADDITION to the transcendental properties of being requires some work--a great deal of it necessarily sketchy and dogmatically presented. But we will try to build everything from the bottom up, from the structures given in experience...
Ratio: Vol. 18, No. 3, September 2005
A Note on Kripke's Footnote 56 Argument for the Essentiality of Origin, ROSS P. CAMERON In footnote 56 of his Naming and Necessity, Kripke offers a "proof" of the essentiality of origin. On its most literal reading the argument is clearly flawed,...
Textuality, Reality, and the Limits of Knowledge *
I HOW MUCH CAN A PERSON KNOW? A Leibnizian Perspective on Human Finitude. How much can someone possibly know? What could reasonably be viewed as an upper limit of an individual's knowledge--supposing that factually informative knowledge rather than...
The American Philosophical Quarterly: Vol. 43, No. 1, January 2006
Epistemological Physicalism and the Knowledge Argument, JESPER KALLESTRUP This paper offers a new solution to the knowledge argument. Both a priori and a posteriori physicalists reject the claim that Mary does not know all the facts, but they do...
The Monist: Vol. 89, No. 2, April 2006
How International Relations Theorists Can Benefit by Reading Thucydides, W. J. KORAB-KARPAROWICZ Thucydides's History of the Peloponnesian War is often seen as an archetypal statement of power politics. He is regarded as a political realist who...
The Perils of Self-Perception: Explanations of Apperception in the Greek Commentaries on Aristotle
ARISTOTLE'S BRIEF CONSIDERATIONS concerning how we perceive that we perceive (1) led to a long and wide-ranging discussion of the problem by his commentators, one that extended over several centuries. From the second century to the sixth, Aristotle's...
The Philosophical Quarterly: Vol. 55, No. 221, October 2005
Just War and the Supreme Emergency Exemption, CHRISTOPHER TONER Recently a number of liberal political theorists, including Rawls and Walzer, have argued for a "supreme emergency exemption" from the traditional just war principle of discrimination...
Visual Intelligence in Painting
PHILOSOPHERS HAVE LONG AGREED that thinking is expressed in the use of language, that we "think in the medium of words." (1) It is also true, however, that we think in the medium of pictures, and it is likely that these two ways of thinking are interrelated;...