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The Review of Metaphysics

Founded in 1947, the Review of Metaphysics is a quarterly journal published by the Philosophy Education Society of the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. Its subject matter covers trade, technical and professional publications; philosophy; indexes, abstracts, reports, proceedings and bibliographies. Kenneth Rolling is the managing editor, Dr. Jude P. Dougherty is the editor and Justin West is the book review editor.

Articles from Vol. 62, No. 2, December

A Functionalist Reinterpretation of Whitehead's Metaphysics
IN HIS CONTRIBUTION to a 1936 APA symposium on the philosophy of Alfred North Whitehead, John Dewey complains that Process and Reality attempts to combine a method of philosophizing based on the mathematical sciences with one based on the natural sciences....
American Philosophical Quarterly: Vol. 45, No. 3, July 2008
The Problem of the Essential Icon, CATHERINE LEGG The article provides information on the philosophical meanings of icon, index, and symbol. It discusses the distinction among these three which are considered as kinds of signification or the three...
European Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 16, No. 2, August 2008
Compassion and the Solidarity of Sufferers: The Metaphysics of Mitleid, DAVID CARTWRIGHT On the centenary of Arthur Schopenhauer's death, Max Horkheimer spoke of his relevance (Aktualitat), praising the philosopher for confronting the horrors of...
European Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 16, No. 3, December 2008
Respecting Value, MARK ELI KALDERON Joseph Raz motivates his own account of respect by criticizing Kant's. Many (though not all) of Raz's criticisms are found deficient--Kant's account, properly interpreted and sympathetically extended, has the...
From Logic to the Person: An Introduction to Edmund Husserl's Ethics
MANY POPULAR INTRODUCTIONS to ethics attempt to systematize ethical theories by distinguishing three different types of normative ethics: virtue ethics, which can be traced back to Aristotle, deontological ethics of a Kantian type, and consequentialist...
Grosholz, Emily R. Representation and Productive Ambiguity in Mathematics and the Sciences
GSCHWANDTNER, Christina M. Reading Jean-Luc Marion: Exceeding Metaphysics. Indiana Series in the Philosophy of Religion. Bloomington, Ind.: Indiana University Press, 2007. xxiii + 320 pp. Cloth, $65.00; Paper, $24.95--The fundamental aim of this handsomely...
Journal of the History of Philosophy: Volume 47, Number 1, January 2009
"Techne" and the Good in Plato's "Statesman" and "Philebus", GEORGE HARVEY This paper addresses a number of questions raised in the Statesman by the Eleatic Visitor's identification of certain ontological conditions for the existence of art of due...
Kantian Autonomy and the Moral Self
KANT'S ACCOUNT OF AUTONOMY is not designed to solve the traditional problem of free will. It is a response to the problem of heteronomy rather than the problem of determinism. And the former pertains to concerns about the structure of practical reason...
Mind: Vol. 117, No. 467, July 2008
Epistemic Conditions for Collective Action, SARA RACHEL CHANT and ZACHARY ERNST Writers on collective action are in broad agreement that in order for a group of agents to form a collective intention, the members of that group must have beliefs about...
Nature and Inertia
NEWTON'S FIRST LAW OF MOTION, also known as the principle of inertia, says "Every body perseveres in its state of being at rest or of moving uniformly straight forward, except insofar as it is compelled to change its state by forces impressed." (1)...
Philosophical Review: Vol. 117, Issue 2, April 2008
Utilitarianism without Consequentialism: The Case o f John Stuart Mill, DANIEL JACOBSON This essay argues, flouting paradox, that Mill was a utilitarian but not a consequentialist. First, it contends that there is logical space for a view that deserves...
Philosophical Review: Vol. 117, Issue 3, May 2008
The Egg and I: Conception, Identity, and Abortion, EUGENE MILLS Suppose you and I are "human beings" in the sense of human "animals," members of the genus "Homo." Given this supposition, this article argues first and foremost that (it's at least...
Philosophy and Phenomenological Research: Vol. 76, Issue 3, May 2008
Klein on the Unity of Cartesian and Contemporary Skepticism, ERIK J. OLSSON "Whatever Begins to Be Must Have a Cause for Its Existence": Hume's Analysis and Kant's Response, HENRY E. ALLISON How Are Basic Belief-Forming Methods Justified, DAVID...
Philosophy and Phenomenological Research: Vol. 77, Issue 1, July 2008
The Virtue of Practical Rationality, SIGRUM SVAVARSDOTTIR Practical rationality is best regarded as a virtue: an excellence in the exercise of one's cognitive capacities in one's practical endeavors. The author develops this idea so as to yield...
Philosophy and Phenomenological Research: Vol. 77, Issue 2, September 2008
Wittgenstein and Bodily Self-Knowledge, EDWARD HARCOURT Expressivism, Inferentialism, and Saving the Debate, MATTHEW CHRISMAN "True" as Ambiguous, MAX KOLBEL This paper argues (a) that the predicate "true" is ambiguously used to express a...
Philosophy: Vol. 83, Issue 4, October 2008
Moral Perception, TIMOTHY CHAPPELL This paper develops an account of moral perception which is able to deal well with familiar naturalistic nonrealist complaints about ontological extravagance and "queerness". It shows how this account can also...
Phronesis: Vol. 53, No. 4/5, November 2008
Doctrinalia Heraclitia I et II: Ame du Monde et Embrasement Universal (Notes de Lecture), SERGE MOURAVIEV In this paper dealing with Heraclitus's doctrine, the author examines two recent controversial articles with the content of which he sympathizes--one...
Ratio: Vol. 21, Issue 3, September 2008
The Harm of Immorality, PAUL BLOOMFIELD A central problem in moral theory is how it is to be defended against those who think that there is no harm in being immoral, and that immorality can be in one's self-interest, assuming the perpetrator is...
The Australasian Journal of Philosophy: Vol. 86, Issue 3, September 2008
The Error in the Error Theory, STEPHEN FINLAY Moral error theory of the kind defended by J. L. Mackie and Richard Joyce is premised on two claims: (1) that moral judgments essentially presuppose that moral value has absolute authority, and (2) that...
The Moral Inevitability of Enlightenment and the Precariousness of the Moment: Reading Kant's What Is Enlightenment?
SYMBOL AND TEXT. Where the Enlightenment is concerned, there are few philosophical texts which are so often cited as Kant's famous essay An Answer to the Question: What is Enlightenment? (1) This occasional text, which started out as an answer to a...
The Philosophical Quarterly: Vol. 58, No. 233, October 2008
A New Defense of Anselmian Theism, YUJIN NAGASAWA Anselmian theists, for whom God is the being than which no greater can be thought, usually infer that he is an omniscient, omnipotent, and omnibenevolent being. Critics have attacked these claims...