Sierra

Sierra is a magazine specializing in Environmental topics.

Articles from Vol. 88, No. 2, March-April

Better Bacon: Sustainable Pork Producers Challenge the Meat Factories. (Food for Thought)
Tom Frantzen guns his four-wheeler across the farmyard, a cart full of empty feed buckets rattling behind. The morning hog chores are done, and he's heading out to make hay before a July thunderstorm roars in. In an age when hog production is dominated...
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Digging for Giants: To Protect Its Habitat, William Fender Must First Prove That Oregon's Largest Earthworm Still Exists
WILLIAM FENDER IS AN UNASSUMING MAN--THIN, WITH a pallid complexion and wire-rimmed spectacles. When he steps into the Oregon woods wearing a pair of faded, hole-pocked jeans, there is a quiet rightness to the scene--an old hippie sort of tranquility....
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Digital Nature. (Illustration)
Wielding his computer's stylus like a high-tech Creator, David Fierstein brings forth waters in a dry landscape. The lazy river he cuts through a forest does more than add scenery to his 3-D illustration: It divides two representations of forest fire...
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Dudley Does Right: While the United States Ignores Global Warming, Canada Works to Halt It. (Lay of the Land)
The U.S. government says it can't be done. But our northern neighbor believes a major industrial nation can significantly reduce its climate-altering pollution without harming its economy. In November, Ottawa unveiled its plan, which involved asking...
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Eco-Equality. (the Sierra Club Bulletin: News for Members)
Rhonda Anderson ends every phone call and e-mail with a single word: "Peace." It's something that's in short supply in her home of Detroit, where 26 percent of inner-city residents live in poverty and one in every 100 people falls victim to violent...
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Forward into the Past: Bush Pushes for the Return of Secret Government. (Ways & Means)
When I first went to Washington as an environmental lobbyist in 1969, the business of government took place behind closed doors. It might have been government for the people, but it certainly wasn't by the people. Congressional committees drafted and...
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Green Elephants: The "Environmental Conscience" of a Party That May Not Want One. (Lay of the Land)
Martha Marks has an unenviable job: She's the president of an organization called Republicans for Environmental Protection. The 2,000 members of "REP America" are trying to keep alive the flame of Teddy Roosevelt (who established the national park...
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Littorally Speaking: 8th Annual Sierra Magazine Contest
The sea is a continual miracle," wrote Walt Whitman in 1856. "The fishes that swim--the rocks--the motion of the waves ... What stranger miracles are there?" Few pastimes are more captivating than scrunching down on a sandy beach and staring off to...
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Move over, Los Angeles: The Nation's Worst Air Has Shifted from City to Farms. (Lay of the Land)
In satellite photographs, the `Los Angeles basin looks a little hazy, but California's much less populated San Joaquin Valley (the southern portion of the great central valley) is cloaked under a murky brown shroud. With its once-fresh country air...
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New Trips Just Added for 2003-2004. (Sierra Club Outings)
Introducing 14 new journeys to satisfy your appetite for adventure! Plus over 350 other great trips to choose from. Check out our website or call for more details. International Mountains, Lochs, and Glens: The West Highland Way, Scotland. September...
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Oh, the Place We'll Go ... (Sierra Club Outings)
With over 350 trips to unique destinations around the world, it's hard to pick favorites ... but we can try! We thought we'd take this opportunity to highlight just four of the amazing regions where we travel, and let our volunteer leaders tell you...
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On the Wind-Whipped Slopes of White Mountain. (Good Going)
On the wind-whipped slopes of White Mountain, geriatric bristlecone pines submit to life's tribulations. For millennia, the trees have clutched the shoulders of this parched 14,000-foot peak in California, overlooking the Great Basin to the east and...
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Staples Goes Green: Students Educate an Office Superstore. (the Sierra Club Bulletin: News for Members)
Last fall, hundreds of activists planned to culminate 600 demonstrations, and two years' work, with a National Day of Action targeting office-supply giant Staples. But instead of protesting on November 13, many were popping open the champagne. The...
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Straight Shooter: A Wyoming Hunter Fights for a West Left Wild. (Profile)
Tory Taylor says it's just the way he's put together, and can't explain beyond that, but he prefers looking at the world from horseback. It may have something to do with the easy way the day and distance unfold before him, how crushed sage smells under...
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The Hidden Life of Tires
At the dawn of the automotive age, it wasn't uncommon for motorists to carry six spare tires on a long journey. Thanks to poor design and bumpy roads, the average driver in 1900 chewed up 37.5 tires each year. Although both tire quality and roads have...
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Tracking the Snow Cat: Hot on the Trail of the Lynx-The Northern Woods' Most Secretive Predator. (Cover Story)
It's been raining off and on all morning, leaving the grass slick, the roads pitted with muddy pools, and the sky churning with sunshine and shadow. It's spring in western Montana; the rivers are running high and the newspapers are running stories...
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Underneath Alaska
With blue skies and temperatures in the 80s, southeast Alaska doesn't feel like a rainforest. Dappled sunlight dances through spruce and hemlock branches swaying 150 feet overhead in the mid-June breeze. In the muskegs--the sponge-like bogs that ring...
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