Black History Bulletin

A peer-reviewed journal dedicated to the education of African Americans. The aim of the publication is to provide primary and secondary educators with innovative materials that teach Black history and conform to national history standards. This is an offi

Articles from Vol. 68, No. 1, Winter

Afterthought: The Imperative of Learning about Legacies
Unfortunately, Jason Hayes' experience (in this volume) of not learning anything about the Niagara Movement in school is not a rare occurrence. Far too many past and present generations of students have similar experiences. These "oversights" are indicative...
Atlanta Exposition Address, 1895
In the decades following the end of Reconstruction, the condition of southern blacks became increasingly precarious. Throughout the South, state legislatures were effectively stripping black men of the voting rights that the 15th Amendment guaranteed...
Foreword-"Walking on Water" as Activism: An Invitation to Learn and a Call for Action
In today's society, we use the phrase, "walks on water" (1) to describe people whose deeds are deemed to be altruistic. Though this phrase resonates from a long-standing spiritual foundation, it has also been used to describe contemporary deeds that...
Publisher's Statement: New Format
Founded in 1937, the Black History Bulletin (formerly the Negro History Bulletin) is the second oldest journal dedicated to the education of African Americans. In contrast to the Journal of Negro Education, established in 1932, the Negro History Bulletin...
The Mis-Education of This Negro: A Preservice Teacher's Quest for a Comprehensive Understanding of African American History and Social Justice
As a preservice teacher who will be teaching U.S. history in a high school during the 2005-2006 academic year, I am committed to ending the mis-education of African American children originally described by Dr. Carter G. Woodson over seventy years...
The Niagara Movement's "Declaration of Principles," 1905
In the summer of 1905, twenty-nine black men from across the United States gathered on the Canadian side of the Niagara Falls to formulate and advance a program of radical protest to counter what they saw as Booker T. Washington's harmful program of...
The Revolution Will Not Be Televised: Exploring Contemporary Social Justice Issues in the United States
"You will not be able to stay home, brother, You will not be able to plug in, turn on and cop out, Because the revolution will not be televised." (1) Gil Scott-Heron I have been teaching high school for fourteen years and U.S. history for two....
We Want Our Children Educated: Promoting Social Justice through African American History Celebrations
I believed in the higher education of a Talented Tenth who through their knowledge of modern culture could guide the American Negro into a higher civilization.... We want our children educated. The school system in the country districts of the South...
When We Call for Education, We Mean Real Education: Making Connections through the Niagara Movement
Connections to Middle School As middle school teachers, we help students maintain focus and create products of authentic assessment by presenting curriculum that is relevant and culturally responsive. For example, we have designed this lesson to...