Social Justice

Quarterly journal provides articles on international dimensions of power, inequality and injustice through focusing on globalization, human and civil rights, immigration issues, social policies affecting welfare and education, ethnic and gender relations and environmental victims.

Articles from Vol. 25, No. 3, Fall

'At Least You're Not Black': Asian Americans in U.S. Race Relations
It is often said that by the year 2015, people of color will constitute a majority of Californians. Those fearful of this future have been vociferously supporting a variety of measures and policies aimed at dismantling affirmative action programs and...
Claiming Collective Memory: Maya Languages and Civil Rights
According to 1992 Nobel Prize Laureate Rigoberta Menchu, about 440 small towns populated by Maya peasants disappeared from Guatemala's map during the first years of the 1980s. In an interview with Mary Jo McConahay (1993), she declared that "about...
Entitled: Confessions of a Model Meritocrat
"I.Q. + Effort = Merit" (Michael Young, The Rise of the Meritocracy, 1958) I Old Man: Six in the evening - and already dark. It didn't used to be like this. Not in the old days. Remember? It could be light at nine, or ten, or even midnight....
From Crisis to Congress: Assessing the Black Radical Congress
Introduction In April 1974, Guyanese scholar Walter Rodney wrote, Political conferences of the oppressed invariably attract a variety of responses - varying from cynical conviction that they are an utter waste of time to naive optimism that they...
From Third World Liberation to Multiple Oppression Politics: A Contemporary Approach to Interethnic Coalitions
Introduction Global industrialization and demographic and economic restructuring in the U.S. compel us to challenge existing paradigms and search for new visions to promote interethnic coalitions. During the past two decades, a large influx of immigrants...
Language Politics in the U.S.A.: The Paradox of Bilingual Education
Enacted at the apex of the Great Society, the Bilingual Education Act was passed by Congress and signed into law by President Johnson without a single voice raised in dissent. Americans have spent the past 30 years debating what it was meant to accomplish....
Local Union Transformation: Analyzing Issues of Race, Gender, Class, and Democracy
During my 28 years of labor movement activism, I have served in every capacity within a local union. I have led and participated in organizing campaigns, contract negotiations, arbitrations, and strikes. Nevertheless, the parts of my union life that...
Racial Disparities in Mortgage Lending: The Example of Urban Ohio
The Fair Housing Act of 1968 prohibits discrimination in lending transactions that are related to home purchases, construction, repairs, improvements, or maintenance. For several years, enforcement of the law was difficult given the lack of readily...
Saving Private Ryan
Like so many World War II veterans (I could see them all around me in the theater audience), I was drawn to see Saving Private Ryan, I had volunteered for the Air Force at the age of 20, and after training as a bombardier went overseas with my crew...
The World Is Waiting for the Sunrise: African Americans Y 'El Mundo Latino.'
About four years ago, the subject of Black/Latino relations took on a sudden urgency in my life. One lazy May afternoon, home from school and slapping bones on the boardwalk with a retired dockworker and a couple of local brothers from Venice, we got...
Work, Immigration, Gender: New Subjects of Cultural Politics
Hello, my name is Fu Lee. I am 41 years old, married, and I have a 9-year-old daughter. I have been living in Oakland Chinatown since I left Hong Kong 12 years ago.... My eyes hurt from straining under poor lighting; my throat hurt because of the chemical...