Social Justice

Quarterly journal provides articles on international dimensions of power, inequality and injustice through focusing on globalization, human and civil rights, immigration issues, social policies affecting welfare and education, ethnic and gender relations and environmental victims.

Articles from Vol. 26, No. 2, Summer

Against Administrative Criminology
Progressive Voices in an Academic Wilderness For approximately three decades social justice has persisted in publishing papers dealing with fairness in law, crime, and other cultural practices. The vision of the journal has always been at odds with...
A Publication Dedicated to the Cause of Justice as It Is to the Nourishment of Critical Thinking
I have over the years come to regard Social Justice as a constituent element in my own growth and development as an independent-minded, politically conscious scholar. I will forever be indebted to the founding editors of this truly amazing publication...
A Quarter of a Century for Social Justice
The call number HV/6001/C673, and the bound volumes that represent the 24 years of the publication of Social Justice stretch over two feet, nine and one-half inches of shelf space on the fourth floor of my university's library. The early volumes repose...
A Testimonial Contribution to the 25th Anniversary Issue of Social Justice
The shortcomings in this tribute are mine, not those of Social Justice (SJ). That is because my own competence is far too limited to permit me to comment knowledgeably, and perhaps even adequately to appreciate, this incisive and wide-ranging journal....
Behind Every Great Fortune There Is a Great Crime
In the first issue of social justice, 25 years ago, Hi Schwendinger's "Editorial" and Tony Platt's article, "Prospects for a Radical Criminology in the United States," laid out an agenda that to a great degree has been fulfilled in the pages of Social...
Celebrating 25 Years
The process of assembling this 25th Anniversary issue has been a delightful one, a revisiting of old friends, kind and encouraging words from newer ones, and steps toward renewal at many levels. We hope to follow up this issue with other initiatives...
Crime and Social Criticism
The pimp, so to speak, is just another form of salesman. - Alvin Gouldner (1973: xiii) Author's Note Late in 1988, the editors of Social Justice invited me to contribute a piece commemorating the 25th Anniversary of the journal. I had coincidentally...
Growing Up a Japanese Boy in Sacramento County
On a sunny June morning in San Francisco's Mission District, Paul arrived with a piece of manzanita that he had crafted into a lovely object. The smooth cross-section of wood reflected reddish brown tones and was richly textured - an exterior blackened...
In Praise of Political Education
Social Justice has been important my political education since the first issue 25 years ago. The journal consistently does for me what all my good teachers have done: it wakes me up to something I've been missing and offers a framework for understanding...
Looking Back: Radical Criminology and Social Movements
There are people who struggle for a day and they are good. There are others who struggle for a year and they are better. There are those who struggle many years, and they are better still. But there are those who struggle all their lives:...
Loss, Renewal, and Frida's Blue House
As I considered the legacy of social justice for this anniversary issue, two qualities stood out: the journal's consistent international perspective and its ability to renew its vitality time and again through two and one-half often tumultuous decades....
On Social Justice: Apartheid and Beyond
In 1986 I was on a lecture tour of the USA. One of my stopovers was San Francisco, where I stayed with Karen Paulsell, then a leading light in the newly established Union for Democratic Communications (UDC). UDC was set up as a home for left-wing communications...
Policing a Class Society: New York City in the 1990s
It would be difficult to overstate the significance of the police institution in our thinking about progressive criminology in the early to mid-1970s. From the outset, Crime and Social Justice (now Social Justice) was concerned with the changing role...
Radical Criminology or Just Criminology - Then, and Now
I have never much liked the phrase "Radical Criminology," and this issue of Social Justice gives me the opportunity to explain why. This isn't a recent reaction caused by advancing middle age. The tendency of many people whose work I know and respect...
Reflections on Social Justice and the Prisoner Struggle
In memory of Attica Brothers Akil Al-Jundi (1941-1997) and Herbert X. Blyden (1937-1997) I would like to reflect on the accomplishments of social justice from the standpoint of my experience as a contributor and occasional guest editor of this remarkable...
Reflexive Social Justice
Since its first publication in 1974, Crime and Social Justice: A Journal of Radical Criminology and the subsequently titled Social Justice: A Journal of Crime, Conflict, and World Order has been the most significant journal in my academic life. In...
Renewal
A few months ago, Paul Takagi and Barry Krisberg organized a reunion commemorating the 25th anniversary of the decision to close down the School of Criminology at Berkeley in 1974, the same year that Social Justice (nee Crime and Social Justice) was...
Seeking Social Justice, Then and Now
It was in 1972 that I arrived at the school of criminology at the University of California, Berkeley. What a relief it was to leave the University of Chicago and its conservatism. The School of Criminology was in a state of flux because of its impending...
Social Justice: 25 Years on Social Justice Has an Important Task
On May 6, 1999, there was a formal launch of a book I had written on the history of a colonial court that drastically undermined the communal social praxis of the indigenous (first nation) people of New Zealand known as Maori. It is called Te Kooti...
Social Justice after the "Death of the Social"
When I wrote my first contribution to social justice (then crime and Social Justice) in 1980, I took the meaning of the "social" more or less for granted. The article (O'Malley, 1981) dealing with Australian bushrangers and United States train robbers...
Social Justice: A View from the Edge?
In a world where journals seem to multiply on a daily basis, Why have I continued to read (Crime and) Social Justice? I can think of four main reasons to explain its continued importance for me. The first is fairly obvious though vitally important....
Still Difficult Times: Social Justice 25 Years Later
We live in difficult times. At the time of this writing, War is raging in Europe. Our own country, Norway, as well as the United States, are engaged, continually dropping bombs in Kosovo and all over Yugoslavia. Ethnic cleansing is taking place on...
The Development of Criminology in Latin America
Introduction Criminology in Latin America today, as elsewhere has lost the importance it acquired in other times. To understand where it stands, and its various perspectives, it is necessary to review the origins of criminology in Latin America....
The First Edition
Until the 1960s, academic criminology was confined by decades of repression in a theoretical and political cage. Obviously, given the repression, one could hardly have expected things to turn out otherwise. Indeed, considering criminology's organic...
The Importance of Issues in Criminology in My Intellectual Life
Today its is probably common knowledge that in 1976 the journal now called Social Justice changed its name to Crime and Social Justice: Issues in Criminology. Issues in Criminology had become a casualty of the politically inspired closure of the School...
The Threat of a Good Example
Occasionally when I'm speaking to college students, attempting to inspire at least a few to fight for social justice, I'm asked the question for which there is no easy answer; the one that goes: "What's the point? Can you really make a difference?...
Twenty-Five Years Later: Revisiting the Challenges to Social Justice
When I first started attending meeting of the American Society of Criminology about 10 years ago, I met several people who recounted stories about the Berkeley School of Criminology in the 1960s. As on other occasions, when friends and colleagues slightly...
Twenty-Five Years of Involvement in Social Justice
My involvement with the journal dates back to its beginning years, in 1974. I joined the editorial board for the second issue of Crime and Social Justice. At the time, I was a secretary in the Italian Department at U.C. Berkeley, and my then-partner,...