Social Justice

Quarterly journal provides articles on international dimensions of power, inequality and injustice through focusing on globalization, human and civil rights, immigration issues, social policies affecting welfare and education, ethnic and gender relations and environmental victims.

Articles from Vol. 33, No. 2, Summer

"All I Need Is One Mic": Mobilizing Youth for Social Change in the Post-Civil Rights Era
THE TITLE OF THIS PIECE IS TAKEN FROM CHORUS OF THE SONG, "ONE MIC" by rapper Nas, who goes on to say, "All I need is one mic to spread my voice to the whole world." (1) I use these lyrics to contextualize the setting for contemporary youth activism...
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Counterrevolution, the Spectacle, and the Situationist Avant-Garde
AMONG THE POST-WORLD WAR II ARTISTIC MOVEMENTS, THE SITUATIONIST International stands out with its persistent, grandiloquent claim to transcend art in a revolutionary act. The critical commitment of the Situationists has resulted in their omission...
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Deploying Weapons of the Weak in Civil Society: Political Culture in Hong Kong and Taiwan
Introduction AT THE CLOSE OF THE 20TH CENTURY, HONG KONG AND TAIWAN HELD THE FIRST national democratic elections in their history. In both settings, a long and complicated set of global maneuvers by more powerful states kept democracy from emerging...
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Editors' Introduction: Art, Power, and Social Change
THE FOLLOWING ESSAYS EXPLORE MANY DIMENSIONS OF THE ROLE OF ART IN PROCESSES of social change. Some address the power of art as a voice of dissent, as a tool for advancing social justice and democracy, as the core of a revolutionary strategy, and as...
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Formalist Art Criticism and the Politics of Meaning
FROM THE 1940s UNTIL THE LATE 1960s, FORMALIST CRITICISM FUNCTIONED TO appropriate modernist art to the market interests and conventional sensibilities of the art world. By its judgments of taste, it certified the worthiness of art objects for markets,...
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Images from the Streets: Art for Social Change from the Homelessness Photography Project
THIS ESSAY EXPLORES THE LANDSCAPE OF HOMELESSNESS, AS IT IS PHOTOGRAPHED by its inhabitants, and the ways in which the act of rendering that landscape visible can foster social change. Images from the Streets" is a photography exhibition, produced...
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Mnemonic Hauntings: Photography as Art of the Missing
Narratives can make us understand. Photographs do something else: they haunt us.--Susan Sontag, Regarding the Pain of Others (2003) The value, I think, of maintaining a distinction between narrative memory and traumatic memory is that it allows...
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New Transdisciplinary Visualities as an Alternative to Redistribute the Power of Thought
When certainty dies, truthfulness appears.--Marco Antonio Montes de Oca, Mexican poet THE EXERCISE OF VISUALITY SURPASSES THE SIMPLE ACT OF OBSERVATION OR EVEN OF analyzing what is seen. We do not see what we see. We see what we have been made to...
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(Not) Being on Time: The Legacy of the Situationist International-A Response to Simeon Hunter
If right and law stem from vengeance, as Hamlet seems to complain--before Nietzsche, before Heidegger, before Benjamin--can one not yearn for a justice that one day, a day belonging no longer to history, a quasi messianic day, would finally be removed...
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Notes on Mexican Art, Social Movements, and Anzaldua's "Conocimiento"
Breaking out of your mental and emotional prison and deepening the range of perception enables you to link inner reflection and vision--the mental, emotional, instinctive, imaginal, spiritual, and the subtle bodily awareness--with social, political...
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Situating Situationism/supporting Its Legacy: Reply to Mikkel Bolt Rasmussen
IN REPLYING TO RASMUSSEN'S ANALYSIS OF DEBORD'S 1957 "RAPPORTSUR LA construction des situations et sur les conditions de l'organisation et de l'action de la tendance situationniste internationale" and its implications for Situationism, it seems necessary...
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