Social Work

Social Work is a journal for social workers. It was founded in 1956 and is published quarterly by the National Association of Social Workers.Subjects include sociology.The editor in chief is Jorge Delva.

Articles from Vol. 39, No. 4, July

A Case for Case Studies in Social Work Research
The case study is a neglected and maligned approach to social work research. Rejected more for how uninformed researchers have used it and less for flaws intrinsic to its nature, the case study is compatible with many forms of social work practice and...
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Adapting Social Work Values to the Corrections Environment
Corrections is a boom industry. In 1988, 951,000 people were incarcerated in jails or prisons in the United States (Bureau of Justice Statistics, 1991a). In 1989, the new prisoner population numbered 40,000 more than that of 1988 (Bureau of Justice Statistics,...
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Attributes, Experiences, and Career Productivity of Successful Social Work Scholars
The availability of a professional knowledge base and the correspondence between this knowledge and what is actually done in practice are hallmarks of any profession (Williams & Hopps, 1987). Thus, a systematic and verifiable knowledge base distinguishes...
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Avoiding Errors in Clinical Prediction
Many practice situations require that social workers make predictions about the future behavior of their clients. Returning children to the care of natural parents, screening mentally ill people for admission to psychiatric treatment facilities, referring...
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Culture, Theory, and Narrative: The Intersection of Meanings in Practice
Professional social work can be substantially enriched by incorporating constructivist appreciations and perspectives into its theory and practice. To do so may require a shift in our understanding of the nature of reality and our stance toward what...
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Does Mentorship among Social Workers Make a Difference? an Empirical Investigation of Career Outcomes
For more than a decade there has been "much ado about mentors" (Roche, 1979, p. 20) in both the popular media and the professional literature. Studies from the fields of business and education and organizational and developmental psychology currently...
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Federal Legislation and the Social Work Profession
At last reading, the administration's national health care reform proposals contained not one reference to social work. It appears that the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) had substantial impact on framing the provisions to include universal...
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From Technical Rationality to Participating Consciousness
The world is not a place we are going. The world is a place we are creating. attributed to Joan of Arc, 15th Century It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye. Antoine de Saint-Exupery, 1943 "Throw...
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Language Policy and Social Work
In Britain the debate about equal opportunities has focused almost exclusively on the issue of race, with language and culture simply being ignored or treated as secondary in significance. The Code of Ethics for Social Work of the British Association...
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Personal Violence and the Culture of Violence
Clinical social workers are increasingly confronting violent behavior and its consequences in their work with clients and family members. This trend has its correlate in the escalating manifestations of violence in the United States as a whole. When...
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Social Work and the Development of a Smoke-Free Society
The goal of health for all by the year 2000 ("The Meaning of," 1978) is congruent with the Swedish concept, originated in the early 1970s, of the first smoke-free generation (Canadian Initiatives, 1983; Roemer, 1982). In the United States and Canada,...
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Social Work as Applied Social Science: A Historical Analysis
The 1980s began with the reintroduction of controversy regarding the nature of social work as an applied social science. Heineman's analysis of social work suggested that it was dominated by an outmoded, overly restrictive paradigm of research (an explicitly...
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Social Workers and Politics: Beyond the Hatch Act
At a time when most Americans are growing increasingly disillusioned with U.S. politics, four trends have emerged that could have significant implications for social workers interested in political action: (1) development of an anti-incumbency movement;...
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Social Work Researchers' Quest for Respectability
In the November 1992 issue of Social Work, Professor Tyson ("A New Approach to Relevant Scientific Research for Practitioners: The Heuristic Paradigm," pp. 541-556) presented a restatement of how the heuristic research paradigm can generate "more useful"...
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Some Implications of Postmodernism for Social Work Practice
In an editorial entitled "Words Create Worlds," Hartman (1991) introduced postmodernism to the field of social work and suggested that this philosophy has important implications for social workers. Her focus was primarily social work education. The aim...
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The Logic of Feminist Standpoint Theory for Social Work Research
The dialectic of relevance and rigor symbolizes the tension between social work practitioners and researchers. Social work practitioners want professional research to be relevant, to contribute to the understanding of human behavior in the social environment,...
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The Problem of Certainty: Clinical Social Work in the Postmodern Era
During my clinical experience I have observed that the help offered to clients and client families by mental health professionals is not always as therapeutic as we would like to believe. One of the reasons our assistance is not always helpful is that...
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The Search for Universal Meanings: Issues in Measurement
Social work practitioners are strongly encouraged to make use of existing research. Knowledge gathered through research efforts offers practitioners many advantages. For example, research builds knowledge to a greater degree than unsubstantiated expertise,...
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