Social Work

Social Work is a journal for social workers. It was founded in 1956 and is published quarterly by the National Association of Social Workers.Subjects include sociology.The editor in chief is Jorge Delva.

Articles from Vol. 50, No. 2, April

American Indian/Alaskan Native Grandparents Raising Grandchildren: Findings from the Census 2000 Supplementary Survey
Social workers increasingly serve families in which grandparents are raising their grandchildren. Many grandparents have found raising a grandchild a rewarding experience (Bahr, 1994; Giarrusso, Silverstein, & Feng, 2000; Minkler & Roe, 1993),...
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Bioterrorism and Smallpox: Policies, Practices, and Implications for Social Work
With the World Trade Center and Pentagon attacks and public angst subsequent to anthrax dissemination, fears of terrorist attacks have escalated dramatically in the United States. A cabinet-level Office of Homeland Security was created, and a system...
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Bush Plan Takes Security out of Social Security
President Bush's plan for social security is putting my friend Veronica's retirement in jeopardy. Age 51, an African American woman with an MBA, paying private school tuition for an accomplished son, Veronica worked for 10 years for a subsidiary of...
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Is There a Global Common Core to Social Work? A Cross-National Comparative Study of BSW Graduate Students
During its century-long existence, social work has become a worldwide profession (Midgley, 2001). The International Federation of Social Workers (IFSW) has 76 member associations, and there are 3,000 schools of social work in 114 countries (International...
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Pet Loss: Implications for Social Work Practice
More than 64 million households in the United States own one or more companion animals (U.S. Census Bureau, 1998). Many pet owners develop strong attachments to their pets and view them as members of the family (Beck & Katcher, 1996). Pets are...
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Social Work and the House of Islam: Orienting Practitioners to the Beliefs and Values of Muslims in the United States
As a consequence of immigration, conversion, and comparatively high birth rates, the Muslim population in the United States is growing rapidly (Melton, 1999; Smith, 1999). Estimates of the number of Muslims in the nation range from one (Kosmin &...
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Social Work in Jewish Community Centers: A Question of Compatibility
A sizable, but unknown, proportion of social workers are employed in host settings. Barker (1999, p. 221) defined a host setting as "an organization within which another organization provides specialized services." Host settings include schools, hospitals,...
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The Influence of Sekentei on Family Caregiving and Underutilization of Social Services among Japanese Caregivers
Underutilization of social services among Asians has been well-documented (for example, Braun & Browne, 1998; Nemoto, 1998). A number of researchers have offered various reasons to explain why Asian family caregivers underutilize social services....
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The Largely Untold Story of Welfare Reform and the Human Services
The relationship between social policy and human services delivery has always been complex and riddled with contradictions. Welfare reform intensified long-standing conflicts and introduced new tensions. The Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity...
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The Role of the Social Worker in the Face of Terrorism: Israeli Community-Based Experience
The effects of the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City and the Pentagon in Washington, DC, on September 11, 2001, and the bombing of the federal building in Oklahoma City in April 1995 continue to be felt. "What has changed...
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