Studies in Romanticism

A scholarly literary quarterly focused on Romanticism and early nineteenth-century literature.

Articles from Vol. 48, No. 4, Winter

"A Good One Though Rather for the Foreign Market": Mercenary Writing and Scott's Quentin Durward
The Mercenary Context: Machiavelli, Ferguson, Smith IN THE PRINCE (1513), NICCOLO MACHIAVELLI SETS OUT PRINCIPLES THAT have ever since grounded opposition to the employment of mercenary and auxiliary troops. (1) "Mercenaries and auxiliaries are...
Romanticism and the Cognitive Science of Imagination
I. Introduction: The Theoretical Return(s) of Romanticism ROMANTICISTS READING IN CONTEMPORARY COGNITIVE SCIENCE WILL frequently experience a strong and gratifying sense of deja-vu. For a reigning topic of the day is imagination, the evolving theory...
Stoned Shelley: Revolutionary Tactics and Women under the Influence
THE PAST FIFTEEN YEARS OF SHELLEY SCHOLARSHIP HAVE BEEN OCCUPIED with bringing the idealist Shelley down to earth. New historicism has patiently uncovered a historical world off which the poet fed, connecting personal acts of consumption with social...
Talking Animals and Reading Children: Teaching (Dis)obedience in John Aikin and Anna Barbauld's Evenings at Home
1. Children's Literature and Political Animals AS WITH CONTEMPORARY CHILDREN'S LITERATURE, THE CHILDREN'S LITERATURE of the late eighteenth century was written for two audiences: the adults whose approval of the works determined whether they would...
Wilkie, Hogarth, and Hazlitt: The Reading of a Will, Its Origins and Legacy
BY 1818 THE SCOTTISH-BORN GENRE PAINTER DAVID WILKIE'S REPUTATION was well established on the European continent. Active in London, where he had been exhibiting regularly since arriving there in 1805, his fame abroad resulted largely from his own efforts,...
Wordsworth, "Simon Lee," and the Craving for Incidents
IN HIS PREFACE TO LYRICAL BALLADS (1800), WILLIAM WORDSWORTH FAMOUSLY, if also enigmatically, defines poetry as "the spontaneous overflow of powerful feelings: it takes its origin from emotion recollected in tranquility." (1) Readers of Wordsworth's...