Studies in Romanticism

A scholarly literary quarterly focused on Romanticism and early nineteenth-century literature.

Articles from Vol. 41, No. 4, Winter

Cain: Lord Byron's Sincerity
BYRON'S 1821 CAIN: A MYSTERY ASKS SOME OBVIOUS AND IMPORTANT questions. At least, they are obvious and important if one takes the book of Genesis literally, as some of his readers then did, and a few still do. Why are the children of Adam and Eve...
Coleridge's Sonnets from Various Authors (1796): A Lost Conversation Poem?
IN AUTUMN 1796, SAMUEL TAYLOR COLERIDGE PUT TOGETHER A MODEST little pamphlet (so modest it has no title) which offers a case-history of how texts can gather new and even urgent meanings through the circumstances of their transmission. Hitherto...
"Dark Catastrophe of Passion": The "Indian" as Human Commodity in Nineteenth-Century British Theatrical Culture
THE MELANCHOLY NATIVE AMERICAN MAY HAVE GAINED CULTURAL ASCENDANCY in England through the popularity of American writers like James Fenimore Cooper and William Cullen Bryant, but the sorrows of the "Indian" appealed to the nineteenth-century British...
Epistemologies of Rupture: The Problem of Nature in Schelling's Philosophy
IN HIS 1801 ESSAY THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN FICHTE'S AND SCHELLING'S System of Philosophy, Hegel set out that difference in terms of a contrast between reflective and speculative philosophy. Dichotomy, rupture [Entzweiung], he argued, gives rise to...
"Everybody's Shakespeare": Representative Genres and John Boydell's Winter's Tale
What injury (short of the theatres) did not Boydell's "Shakespeare Gallery" do me with Shakespeare! To have Opie's Shakespeare, Northcote's Shakespeare, light-headed Fuseli's Shakespeare, heavy-headed Romney's Shakespeare, wooden-headed West's...
"The Most Useful of Citizens": Towards a Romantic Literary Professionalism
How few authors or artists have arrived at eminence who have not lived by their employment? --Mary Wollstonecraft, Letters Written During a Short Residence in Sweden, Norway, and Denmark 1. "Things Shall be Valued in Proportion as They are...