Studies in the Novel

An international literary quarterly that publishes literary criticism and scholarship on the novel. Includes essays on well-known and lesser-known novelists of all periods and countries. Contents include essays, reviews of recent books on novels and novel

Articles from Vol. 36, No. 4, Winter

Americanness Becomes Modernism in James's the Ambassadors
Gertrude Stein said, famously, that Henry James was "the only nineteenth century writer who being an American felt the method of the twentieth century" (78). Like so much of Stein's writing, this statement mixes hyperbole with an acute critical insight....
Glazed Expression: Mary Barton, Ghosts and Glass
I begin with some problematic sightseeing. In its 1855 survey of charitable activity in London, The Quarterly Review described the spectacle of freshly opened dark space brought to light in the recent street clearances: The reader may, perhaps,...
The Confessions of Todd Andrews: Double-Directed Discourse in the Floating Opera
John Barth's first novel, The Floating Opera, has received more varied critical attention, ironically enough, than his more sophisticated, self-regarding works that court this kind of "indeterminacy." Although Barth's later works have drawn a number...
The Return of the Prodigal Daughter: Finding the Family in Amelia Opie's Novels
Even as Amelia Opie becomes a better appreciated and more established writer in "novel studies," it is important to remember that Opie herself eschewed the novelistic label for her works. In her address "To the Reader" that precedes The Father and...
The Social Construction of Homosexuality in Iris Murdoch's Fiction
In his recent biography of his Murdoch, Peter Conradi praises the novelist and philosopher for her "sympathetic and adventurous" treatment of homosexuality (424). A detailed reading of Conradi's work may reveal the underlying basis for Murdoch's sympathy...