Studies in the Novel

An international literary quarterly that publishes literary criticism and scholarship on the novel. Includes essays on well-known and lesser-known novelists of all periods and countries. Contents include essays, reviews of recent books on novels and novel

Articles from Vol. 25, No. 3, Fall

'Brideshead Revisited' and the Modern Historicization of Memory
In a 1969 article "The Uses of History in Fiction," based on a panel discussion at a meeting of the Southern Historical Association, C. Van Woodward notes that "Over the last two centuries novels have become increasingly saturated with history, and...
Narrative Inscription, History and the Reader in Robert Coover's 'The Public Burning.'
Robert Coover, one of the most impressive of the postmodern American novelists, established in his early fiction a preoccupation with the ways our various explanatory narratives impose upon the truth of our experience. His exploration of these ideas...
Reading Blackwater Park: Gothicism, Narrative, and Ideology in 'The Woman in White.'
With The Woman in White Wilkie Collins wrote, Peter Brooks notes, a "slightly perverse, dilatory, almost fetishistic text of narrative pleasure," one replete with "readers and writers constantly scribbling and constantly reading one another, even when...
Some Theories of One's Own: 'Orlando' and the Novel
I thought how unpleasant it is to be locked out; and I thought how it is worse perhaps to be locked in.(1) The novel is often celebrated for its multiplicity of voices, for its amoeba-like capaciousness and scope. It has been described as...
"Subtle, but Remorseful Hypocrite": Dimmesdale's Moral Character
The Reverend Mister Arthur Dimmesdale is usually understood to be guilty of two sins, one of commission (his adultery with Hester) and one of omission (his cowardly and hypocritical failure to confess). This is his state through most of The Scarlet...
'Villette' and 'The Marble Faun.'
Commenting on Nathaniel Hawthorne's problem of casting an imaginative glow over bleak New England, "so provokingly raw and deficient in harmony," Leslie Stephen compares his task to that of Charlotte Bronte in painting the rugged life and topography...