Studies in the Novel

An international literary quarterly that publishes literary criticism and scholarship on the novel. Includes essays on well-known and lesser-known novelists of all periods and countries. Contents include essays, reviews of recent books on novels and novel

Articles from Vol. 34, No. 4, Winter

"A Great Engine for Good": The Industry of Fiction in Elizabeth Gaskell's Mary Barton and North and South
Written in an age that evaded mundane representations of both women's and literary work, Elizabeth Gaskell's social-problem novels express discomfort with commercial and competitive enterprises. By the end of Mary Barton, the novel's most public...
"Am I a Monster?": Jane Eyre among the Shadows of Freaks
Is it an Animal? Is it Human? Is it an Extraordinary Freak of Nature? Or is it a legitimate member of Nature's Work? --The Illustrated London News, 29 August, 1846 In the deep shade, at the farther end of the room, a figure ran backwards and...
Seven Recent Commentaries on Mark Twain. (Essay-Review)
Jonathan Arac. "Huckleberry Finn" as Idol and Target: The Functions of Criticism in Our Time. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1997. Ken Burns. Mark Twain. Television documentary, 2002. Jocelyn Chadwick-Joshua. The Jim Dilemma: Reading...
The Political Limits of (Western) Humanism in Andre Brink's Early Fiction
Andre Brink's writing since the publication in 1974 in English of his first politically committed novel, Looking on Darkness, is usually read as an indictment of apartheid. Allan Findlay, writing in 1984, notes that "Brink has directed his writing...
Triangulated Passions: Love, Self-Love, and the Other in Thomas Hardy's the Well-Beloved
... but when I try to imagine a faultless love Or the life to come, what I hear is the murmur Of underground streams, what I see is a limestone landscape. W. H. Auden In W. H. Auden's poem "In Praise of Limestone," faultless love reminds the...