Nathaniel Hawthorne Review

Articles from Vol. 36, No. 1, Spring

Allegories of Childhood Gender: Hawthorne and the Material Boy
Fan and Josie are always my darlings, and I am glad to see them at any time, and any where; but Bob, and Harry, and Ned are perfect torments. They annoy me and mortify me, and half the time disgust me. Yet when they were little, I loved them just as...
Along the Wayside
Please find recent Hawthorne news in this column. Send in pertinent information! Registration for the upcoming Nathaniel Hawthorne Society Conference in Concord, Massachusetts (organized by President Richard Kopley), June 10-13, 2010 (with the theme,...
Blending Science and Classicism in a New Moral Pedagogy: A Fresh Look at Hawthorne's Wonder-Book
While traditionally considered the first creative American children's book to value childhood imagination over didacticism, Nathaniel Hawthorne's A Wonder-Book for Girls and Boys, published in 1852, may be explored more usefully as a key text in the...
From the Editor's Gable
The Boughton image of "Hester and Pearl in the Forest" that graces the cover of this special issue conveys to me sources of inspiration for many of Hawthorne's writings: transgressive women, wayward children, and the wilderness that all Romantics,...
Hawthorne 2.0
"Hawthorne wrote more pieces directly aimed at a juvenile audience than any other canonical male author of the antebellum period." Karen Sanchez-Eppler, "Hawthorne and the writing of childhood" At the risk of beginning with a twice-told tale,...
Hawthorne, Grace Greenwood, and the Culture of Pedagogy
Hawthorne's letter of 1838 to Longfellow musing on the possibility of jointly creating a children's book that "would entirely revolutionize the whole system of juvenile literature" regularly appears in studies of Hawthorne's writings for children....
"None but Imaginative Authority": Nathaniel Hawthorne and the Progress of Nineteenth-Century (Juvenile) Literature in America
Writing to Henry Wadsworth Longfellow on March 21, 1838, Nathaniel Hawthorne proposed to "make a great hit, and entirely revolutionize the whole system of juvenile literature" in America (15: 266). This first experiences with that genre, though not...
Pragmatic Politics and the Dream of Heroism: Hawthorne's Life of Pierce and Tanglewood Tales
"I never did anything else so well as these old baby-stories," Nathaniel Hawthorne professed in March 1853 after completing The Tanglewood Tales, the sequel to his well-received 1851 publication, A Wonder Book for Girls and Boys. (1) Just four months...
The Healing Arts of Play: Scenes of Self-Determination in Hawthorne's Biographical Stories for Children
The plays of childhood are the germinal leaves of all later life ... Friedrich Froebel, The Education of Man (55) (1826) One August evening, visiting the Berkshires in 1838, Nathaniel Hawthorne joined a funeral procession, as locals and even...
The King's Two Bodies, and the Slave's: Diasporic History in the Whole History of Grandfather's Chair
As the anti-slavery movement reached a fever pitch shortly after enactment of the Fugitive Slave Law in 1850, Nathaniel Hawthorne wrote to Zachariah Burchmore, "I have not ... the slightest sympathy for the slaves" (16:456). Despite recent observations,...
Three Illustrators of "The Snow-Image: A Childish Miracle"
Adding a P.S. to a letter to James Fields (14 November 1863), Nathaniel Hawthorne wrote: James G. Gregory of New York, art publisher, has written to me asking permission to publish the Snow-Image as a picture book, with colored illustrations....
"Vanished Scenes ... Pictured in the Air": Hawthorne, Indian Removal, and the Whole History of Grandfather's Chair
"The Tory's Farewell," one of the final sketches in Hawthorne's The Whole History of Grandfather's Chair, a series of historical fiction for children, attempts a sensitively wrought depiction of the loyalist expulsion from Boston after the American...