Brookings Review

Quarterly magazine focuses on economic, political and foreign policy issues.

Articles from Vol. 19, No. 4, Fall

Cross-Border Financial Interdependence Helpful and Hazardous
Are the increasingly large and rapid movements of trillions of dollars across national borders enhancing the world's prosperity? Or are these flows an enormous pool of footloose money that provokes financial turbulence, disrupts national economies,...
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Culture Wars? How Americans and Europeans View Globalization
If the fulminations of some European pundits and politicians are to be believed, globalization is a project foisted by Americans on an unwilling world--in particular, an unwilling Europe, whose aroused public stands ready to defend not only the continent's...
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Does Globalization Promote Democracy? an Early Assessment
An enduring tenet of the post-Cold War era is that globalization be a catalyst for democratization.In one formulation when democratic ideals sweep (or even trickle) across borders into authoritarian states, globalization makes democratization inevitable,...
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Global Warming Heats Up: Uncertainties, Both Scientific and Political, Lie Ahead
The global warming debate is heating up. President George W. Bush rejects the Kyoto Protocol as a "fatally flawed" agreement that would harm the American economy. The European Union, Japan, and other industrialized countries counter that Kyoto represents...
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Heavy Traffic: International Migration in an Era of Globalization
At the start of the new millennium, some 150 million people, or 2.5 percent of the world's population, live outside their country of birth. That number has doubled since 1965, With poverty, political repression, human rights abuses, and conflict pushing...
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Managing a Globalizing World: An Overview. (Cover Story)
The massive street protests at last July's G-8 summit in Genoa, Italy--following similar demonstrations at other international gatherings in Gotenberg, Prague, Washington, Davos, and Seattle--have focused the world's attention as never before on the...
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Ready for a Launch? the Prospects for Global Trade Negotiations
With only two months left until the World Trade Organization meeting in Doha, Qatar, it is still an open question whether trade ministers will agree to launch a new round of global trade talks. How the question is resolved matters for the livelihoods...
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Terrorism Goes Global: Extremist Groups Extend Their Reach Worldwide
Despite the innumerable and oft-discussed ways in which we are vulnerable to them, terrorist attacks are rare. An attack occurs only when a perpetrator vile enough to commit it, a motive strong enough to rouse him to action, a target germane to the...
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The Globalization of Disease: When Congo Sneezes, Will California Get a Cold?
In a bold speech in early June marking the 20th anniversary of the first report of HIV/AIDS, United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan called on the private sector as well as donor governments to contribute to a $7-10 billion global trust fund to...
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Weapons of Mass Destruction: Does Globalization Mean Proliferation?
In testimony to Congress last June, Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld joined a decade-old chorus of experts who proclaim that multiple proliferation threats are growing. Citing "some important facts which are not debatable" Rumsfeld asserted that,...
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Winners and Losers: Perspectives on Globalization from the Emerging Market Economies
In the past few years, routine meetings on the operations of the international financial institutions or on the future of free trade have filled the streets of usually peaceful cities like Seattle, Prague, and Quebec with riot police, tear gas, and...
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Workers Rights: Labor Standards and Global Trade
Of all the debates surrounding globalization, one of the most contentious involves trade and workers' rights. Proponents of workers' rights argue that trading nations should be held to strict labor standards--and they offer two quite different justifications...
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