Brookings Review

Quarterly magazine focuses on economic, political and foreign policy issues.

Articles from Vol. 14, No. 2, Spring

Assessing the 104th Congress: (This One Is Different!)
IT IS RASH TO EVALUATE a Congress before its full two-year term has been completed. Assessing it on the basis of its first one-year session is evil riskier. Still, while a proper review must come later, the 104th Congress has surely been interesting...
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A Winning Hand? the Uncertain Future of Environmental Justice
During its halcyon legislative days in the 1970s, the public face of environmentalism was overwhelmingly white and middle class. Minority politicians provided reliable votes for environmental statutes but were often acutely suspicious of mainstream...
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Broken Bottles: Alcohol, Disorder and Crime
Over the past quarter-century, Americans have spent billions of dollars to wage a war on drugs as part of a broader effort to fight crime and community breakdown, especially in the inner city. The particular focus on illicit drugs, however, has kept...
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Burundi: There Is No Exit Strategy
Last December United Nations Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali proposed that the UN station a preventive military force in Zaire to prepare to intervene against massive violence or genocide in neighboring Burundi. The secretary general got the...
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Drug Legalization: Time for a Real Debate
Whether Bill Chnton "inhaled" when trying marijuana as a college student was about the closest the last presidential campaign came to addressing the drug issue. The present one, however, could be very different. For the fourth straight year, a federally...
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Health Care Financing: What Next?
Henry Aaron ("End of an Era: The New Debate over Health Care Financing," winter issue) Predicts three stages in the future debate over health care. The first stage will be a period of rising numbers with declining access to care. The evolution of...
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In with the GOP: Building a New Regime on Capitol Hill
The new Republican congressional majority faced a daunting challenge upon arriving in Washington late in 1994. To carry out their pledge to cut the federal government down to size, they had to pare back or wipe out the accretions of more than 60 years...
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Mexico: The Slippery Road to Stability
Mexico, slowly emerging from its worst economic crisis in decades, is in the midst of a difficult political transition. America's neighbor to the south is struggling to break free of its authoritarian past to become a true democracy, complete with...
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New Players: The Governors and Welfare Reform
Whatever may happen with welfare reform in this super-heated political season, the role played by governors is worthy of notice. As in 1987-88, when the Family Support Act was passed, in 1995 governors were leading players in policymaking for welfare....
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No Free Lunch on Tax Reform
Fundamental tax reform - replacing the income tax with a new tax system - has attracted increased attention of late. The best known proposal is the flat tax. Pioneered by Robert Hall and Alvin Rabushka of the Hoover Institution, it has been championed...
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Raising the Stakes: Involving the Public and Enhancing Equity in Market Reforms
Worldwide resource constraints and ideological shifts are pushing more and more countries - not just communist and other state-led economies, but advanced industrial economies as well - toward the market. Many are moving beyond economic reform to reevaluate...
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The Marines Should Come Home: Adapting the U.S.-Japan Alliance to a New Security Era
Okinawans have long felt unfairly burdened by the U.S. military presence in Japan. Japan's smallest and poorest prefecture, Okinawa houses about three-fourths of the US. military facilities and two-thirds of the 45,000 American troops in Japan. Roughly...
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The Media and South Africa
Last January the New York Times ran on its front page a story headlined "As Crime Soars, South African Whites Leave." The story made great copy and quickly became "journalistic gospel." But when the Associated Press Bureau in Johannesburg was asked...
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Worsening American Income Inequality: Is World Trade to Blame?
Since 1970 American income have become strikingly less equal. Living standards of poor and lower middle-class Americans have fallen while those of affluent Americans have continued to improve. And the trend toward inequality has not been confined to...
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