Brookings Review

Quarterly magazine focuses on economic, political and foreign policy issues.

Articles from Vol. 16, No. 1, Winter

Antitrust Regulation across National Borders: The United States Boeing versus the European Union of Airbus
There was a certain irony when President Clinton threatened in July to go to the World Trade Organization if the European Union moved against Boeing's acquisition of McDonnell Douglas. * "I'm concerned about what appears to be the reasons for the objection...
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Avoiding Another Cyprus or Israel
A favorite observation of commentators on Bosnia these days is that Bosnians, have been able to live together in peace only under an external power--an empire, a dictator--that could prevent their ethnic hatreds and passions from exploding into internecine...
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Congress & Regulatory Reform: Achievements and Prospects
The 1994 election of the first Republican Congress since the early Eisenhower years guaranteed a dramatic change in the political environment for regulation. No longer would the crafty auto-industry defender John Dingell (D-MI) chair the House Committee...
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Deregulating Campaign Finance: Solution or Chimera
The reports of widespread fundraising abuses in the 1996 elections have precipitated another heated debate about whether and how best to alter the rules under which money is raised and spent to influence federal elections. Alleged violations of existing...
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Environmental Protection and the States: "Race to the Bottom" or "Race to the Bottom Line."
When Congress laid the foundation for today's environmental regulation in the early 1970s, the idea that states inevitably cut corners in pollution control and conservation to attract business was a powerful argument for national action. When industrial...
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Information Technology & the Securities Markets: The Challenge for Regulators
Massive technological advances, including the increasingly widespread acceptance of the Internet, are revolutionizing U.S. financial markets. Information flows are becoming seamless and borderless, instantaneous and almost costless. The swift changes...
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Lifting the Heavy Hand: The Challenge of Reforming America's Regulatory State
"Regulatory reform." For most Americans the first reaction to these words may well be a yawn. Even inside the Beltway, only the most tireless stakeholders and policy wonks can get themselves worked up over the arcana of rule-making procedures, benefit-cost...
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Smoke and Mirrors: Understanding the New Scheme for Cigarette Regulation
Last June. U.S. cigarette companies, together with government officials , chiefly state attorneys general, drafted proposed federal legislation that would, if enacted, have a sweeping effect on the regulation of cigarettes, as well as on prospective...
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Social Regulations as Trade Barriers: How Regulatory Reform Can Also Help Liberalize Trade
As U.S. regulatory reformers scrutinize the costs and benefits of federal regulations, they should also heed the regulation-related complaints of unfair trade practices from America's trading partners. For Just as many U.S. health, safety, and environmental...
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The Battle over Fixing the IRS
In a dozen B-movies from the 1950s, cowboys formed a posse, saddled up, and rode around shooting into the air. There was always a lot of noise and bad dialogue, but little real action. The battle over reforming the Internal Revenue Service has...
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The "Big Bang"?: An Ambivalent Japan Deregulates Its Financial Markets
Regulatory reform is a hot issue in the United States, as other articles in these pages attest. Successes over the past several decades in deregulating transportation and financial services are being followed by new moves to make government social regulation...
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The New Pork Barrel: What's Wrong with Regulation Today and What Reformers Need to Do to Get It Right
As the federal government's discretionary spending in the 1990s has become less lavish, so has the supply of old-fashioned lard in the U.S. budget. But if you think this means the era of big government is over, think again. Another pork barrel is burgeoning....
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Turning the Bosnia Ceasefire into Peace
Since they were signed in 1995, the Dayton accords have accomplished a great deal in Bosnia. Armed conflict has been stopped and further genocide and widespread ethnic cleansing prevented. Troop casualties in the NATO-led operation have been extremely...
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