The Exceptional Parent

Exceptional Parent is a magazine providing practical information and guidance to parents of children and young adults with disabilities and the professionals who serve them. It was founded in 1971 and is published monthly by Psy-Ed Corp.Subjects include disabilities. The editor in chief is Rick Rader.

Articles from Vol. 39, No. 10, October

Finding the Right Toy for a Child with Special Needs
According to Elisa Mintz Delia, a trained play therapist who coordinates toy testing at the Kennedy Krieger Institute, toys for children with disabilities don't have to cost a fortune. "People can spend an unnecessary amount of money on expensive toys...
Going to Work. Must You? Should You?
Is someone in your family who has special needs thinking about getting a job? Perhaps your teen-age child's friends have their first part-time jobs, and your child now wants the same. Or an adult in your family misses his or her career or feels the...
Guiding Your Teenager with Special Needs through the Transition from School to Adult Life: Tools for Parents
Guiding Your Teenager with Special Needs Through the Transition From School to Adult Life: Tools for Parents By Mary Korpi [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] In this useful guidebook, mental health and vocational rehabilitation counselor Mary Korpi offers...
It's Not Just a Job ... It's a Career: The Arc of Northern Virginia's Co-Executive Director Program Serves as a National Model for "Creative Supported Employment"
It started as an "experiment" three years ago, designed to answer the question: can a person with an intellectual disability (ID) or developmental disability (DD), with the right supports in place, take on a highly visible leadership position as Co-Executive...
Jaden Webster ... My Child with Autism
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] It's been a long dark road trying to get care for my son who has autism. Until recently, our family felt that it was hopeless for anyone with a child with autism to get help, except if you're wealthy. The cost to support a...
Lessons in Transition: Planning for a Child Moving to Her Own Place in the Community
Finding a suitable place in the community for an adult child with disabilities to live on her own is often a primary goal for both parent and child. Many parents find this goal difficult to achieve, knowing that a delay in the transition can reduce...
Living in the Right State May Be Important If You Have a Child with a Disability
Selecting a place to live involves a complex series of subjective and/or objective factors ranging from employment, finances (including costs of housing), proximity to family members (especially grandchildren--you can tell that two of us are grandparents),...
Microenterprise: An Alternative to Traditional Jobs
A microenterprise, as the name implies, is a very small business, typically employing only the owner or one to two other employees. Microenterprise is fast becoming a viable and attractive option for adults with a wide range of disabilities, including...
Revealing Epilepsy to Other Parents, Schools, and in the Workplace: This Is the Fourth in a Series of Four Articles about How to Tell Others about Your or Your Child's Epilepsy
Telling Another Parent If your child has epilepsy, you will be confronted with the need to tell the parents of your child's friends about your child's epilepsy. This can be exceedingly difficult for a parent the first few times. We all like to think...
Starting Somewhere: Folks with Unique Communication Needs Make Their Way at Work
A mix of technologies and human dynamics can make good communication a workplace reality when workers cannot take for granted that they'll be understood. As more people using augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) because of significant speech...
The 2009 Toy Review & Gift Guide
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] The holiday season is coming soon, and it's time for EP to recommend some fun toys and games, plus a few helpful products for families of children with special needs. Some of this year's picks are educational, some are entertaining,...
The Bowen Foundation
As Bryan Levy, the father of a child with autism, recalls the first days after he and his wife received his son's diagnosis, he gives real world insight into the daunting journey of navigating this ambiguous disorder. "When my son, Bowen, was diagnosed...
The New Path to Employment: Navigating Rocky Economic Times to Find Success in the Working World
[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] Introducing Amy "Did you clock in, honey?" "Yeah, I did, Dad." And with that, 25-year-old Amy Grunzinger rolls up her sleeves, pulls on plastic gloves and begins her shift at Schnucks, a St. Louis-area grocery store....
The Team Approach to Helping Children with Autism Succeed at Home, School, and in the Community
From the time a child is diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD)--often before age three--to the time he or she transitions into the adult world, it is the responsibility of parents, guardians, therapists, and educators to provide the best...
The Time to Begin Looking for Community Rehabilitation Programs Offering Vocational Services Is ... Now!
The school year has begun and students have returned to class, excited about new opportunities, friends, and experiences. And with each new school year comes a new graduating class, all looking forward to the future and what it holds. Some go to college,...
The Value of Structure: My Daughter Graduated from High School Two Years Ago and Has Lost Ground. One of the Comments I Heard Is That She Misses the Structure. What Does That Mean?
Structure is how we create the rhythm of our life. Some of us need more external structure than others; jobs with set schedules and places, versus vacations with no goal, deadlines or reservations. Some people seem to blossom in a school environment....
Through Volunteering, We Can All Win!
In June, the EP website (www.eparent.com) featured the article, "No More Teachers, No More Books, No More Empty Pocketbooks!" This piece contained suggestions and resources to help teens with special needs get both voluntary and paid summer jobs and...
U-M Doctoral Students Get First-Hand Look at Specialized CP Clinic
Studying pertinent cases is a good way for any student to learn. However, actually witnessing them in progress is even better. That sums it up for University of Michigan-Flint Physical Therapy doctoral student Pamela Corden, whose observation time...
Why It Matters
The nature of physicians is that they all have their own style, their own approach, their own beliefs and their own frame of mind. One thing is for certain, when you get 20 or so physicians in the same room it's rare that someone will say something...