Asian Theatre Journal

Covers the performing arts of Asia, focusing upon both traditional and modern theatrical forms. It aims to facilitate the exchange of knowledge throughout the international theatrical community for the mutual benefit of all interested scholars and artists. It offers descriptive and analytical articles, original plays and play translations, book and audiovisual reviews, and reports of current theatrical activities in Asia.

Articles from Vol. 27, No. 1, Spring

An Overview of Research on Classical Chinese Drama in North America (1998-2008)
With the generous support of a fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies, in 2008 I spent ten months researching in the field of comparative theater studies at Washington University in St. Louis. After serious consideration, I focused...
Depictions of the Kawara-No-In in Medieval Japanese No Drama
One of the central preoccupations of medieval Japanese no drama, and indeed of medieval Japanese cultural genres in general, is the depiction of the remote past. Events, characters, sites, and texts from the Nara (710-794), Heian (794-1185), and Kamakura...
Drama of Disillusionment: Nepal's Theatre, 1990-2006
Nepal Wins Democracy Nepal won its democracy in April 1990 after a costly battle. Though divisive and sometimes violent, the prodemocracy movement was energized by hope for a better future. It rallied millions of Nepalis who demanded their say in...
From the Editor
This issue brings together a number of essays that focus not on performance itself but the stuff around it: the interpretations of a site used as the locale for no texts in an essay by Paul Atkins, the no flute in Mariko Anno's debut panel essay, and...
Mimicry and Counter-Discourse on the Palimpsest of Nagori: The Play of Saint Anthony and His Double, Sadhu Antoni
Hardly half a kilometer southeast from the Church of Saint Nicholas Tolentino at Nagori, thirty-five kilometers northeast from Daka, Bangladesh, stands the Chapel of Saint Anthony at Panjora. Here, on Friday, 6 February 2009, nearly seventy thousand...
Nokan (No Flute) and Oral Transmission: Cohesion and Musicality through Mnemonics
Japanese no is a comprehensive art form that includes music, drama, literature, and the use of costumes and masks. It was created more than six hundred years ago and continues today as a living art form reflecting the personalities and preferences...
Performing Change/changing Performance: An Exploration of the Life of a Street Play by the Jana Natya Manch
In 2005 film director Lalit Vachani was shooting his documentary Natak Jari Hai (The Play Goes On, 2005), a film on the Jana Natya Manch (Peoples' Theatre Forum, Janam), a political street theatre group based in Delhi. He wanted the group to perform...
Speaking of Flowers: Theatre, Public Culture, and Homoerotic Writing in Nineteenth-Century Beijing
As a minor literature composed and consumed by China's nineteenth-century literati elite, "flower guides" (huapu, also "flower register") provide opportunity for exploring vital questions of popular culture in late imperial China, questions relating...