Asian Theatre Journal

Covers the performing arts of Asia, focusing upon both traditional and modern theatrical forms. It aims to facilitate the exchange of knowledge throughout the international theatrical community for the mutual benefit of all interested scholars and artists. It offers descriptive and analytical articles, original plays and play translations, book and audiovisual reviews, and reports of current theatrical activities in Asia.

Articles from Vol. 22, No. 2, Fall

Balinese Mask Dance from the Perspective of a Master Artist: I Ketut Kodi on Topeng
I Ketut Kodi is one of the most important performers of Balinese topeng (mask) dance. In this interview he shares insight into his education as a performer and his obligations as a mask dancer in contemporary Bali. Kathy Foley is a professor of...
Chinese-Speaking Theatre in Perspective: A Symposium: Drama Programme, Chinese University of Hong Kong, 12-16 July 2004
A symposium on the last ten years of Chinese theatre in Hong Kong shows the diversity of modern drama in Taiwan, the People's Republic, Hong Kong, and Singapore and points to a rapidly changing future. Li Ruru is author of Shashibiya: Staging Shakespeare...
Editor's Note
The articles in this issue share insights into the mask performance of Indonesia and Japan and, in preliminary ways, point to connections to India, China, or Central Asia. Anyone who does research on the traditional arts of Asia recognizes current...
Lions, Witches, and Happy Old Men: Some Parallels between Balinese and Japanese Ritual Masks
The visual and choreographic parallels between Japanese and Balinese mask traditions are striking, and, though the exact interrelationship between masks of these two cultures cannot be proven with historically verifiable data, juxtaposition of the...
Mask, Gender, and Performance in Indonesia: An Interview with Didik Nini Thowok
Contemporary mask performer Didik Nini Thowok carries on a venerable tradition of Javanese female impersonation by a male dancer. His study of cross-gender performance throughout Asia and the world fuels his playful, modern performance, presented in...
Masks, Interface of Past and Future: Nomura Mannojo's Shingigaku
To Manzo Sending my thousands of thoughts Curtain closes Manzo ni Mankan no omoi o komete Senshuraku --Mannojo, quoted on his deathbed Asahi Newspaper, 20 July 2004 Kyogen actor Nomura Mannojo developed Shingigaku ("true"...
Only Joking? the Relationship between the Clown and Percussion in Jingju
The prime function of the clown (chou) in jingju (Beijing "opera") has often been considered as light entertainment, but there is evidence that could support a different interpretation. The clown is associated with the origin of Chinese acting, and...
Putul Yatra: A Celebration of Indian Puppetry: Sangeet Natak Akademi New Delhi, March 17-28, 2003
A 2003 festival in New Delhi highlighted the state of contemporary Indian puppetry. Brad Clark is a designer, puppeteer, and professor at Bowling Green State University in Ohio. ********** The Indian Puppetry Festival Putul Yatra, sponsored by...
Samritechak
SAMRITECHAK. Conceived and directed by Sophiline Cheam Shapiro. Royal University of Fine Arts, Phnom Penh. Carpenter Performing Arts Center, Long Beach, 30 January 2003. Ninety percent of all classical performing artists in Cambodia (including dancers,...
The Mardi Gras Boys of Singapore's English-Language Theatre
This short paper is extracted from a larger project that explores colonial and intercultural queer encounters in performance. Focusing on Singapore as a transnational site, I study how Mardi Gras is appropriated and staged in a local English-language...
Topeng Sidha Karya: A Balinese Mask Dance
Performed by I Ketut Kodi with I Gusti Putu Sudarta, I Nyoman Sedana, and I Made Sidia in Sidha Karya, Badung, Bali, 16 October 2002 Transcribed by I Ketut Kodi; translated by I Nyoman Sedana and Kathy Foley; introduced by Kathy Foley After a...
Woman and the Changing World on Alternative Global Stage: Sixth Women Playwrights International Conference: Manila, 14-20 November 2003
This review focuses on the sixth Women Playwrights International (WPI) conference and festival, held in Manila, Philippines, in November 2003. Through a discussion of how the WPI festival both interrogates and stages a mainstream international festival,...