The Journal of Speech-Language Pathology and Applied Behavior Analysis

Articles from Vol. 2, No. 4, Winter

A Review of the Behavioral Theories of Autism and Evidence for an Environmental Etiology
Introduction Autism, Asperger's Syndrome, and pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS) represent the Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASDs). Currently considered a low-incidence disability, autism is the fastest growing developmental...
Auditory and Visual Aspects of Emotion Production by Children and Adults
Introduction The meaning of a communication is transmitted not only by what is said but also by how it is said and by the speaker's mood and attitude toward what is said. The speaker's tone of voice and facial expressions often provide a listener...
Evaluation of Mand-Reinforcer Relations Following Long-Term Functional Communication Training
Introduction Functional communication training (FCT) is a treatment for destructive (e.g., self-injurious, aggressive) and other problem behavior and is composed of two steps: (a) identifying the function (maintaining reinforcer) of destructive...
Experimental Models for the Evaluation of Speech and Public Speaking Anxiety: A Critical Review of the Designs Adopted
Introduction Communication apprehension is defined as "an individual's level of fear or anxiety associated with either real or antecipated communication with another person or persons" (McCroskey, 1984). McCroskey & Richmond (1987) identify...
Greer &. Ross (2007): Verbal Behavior Analysis: Inducing and Expanding New Verbal Capabilities in Children with Language Delays
Greer &. Ross (2007): Verbal Behavior Analysis: Inducing and Expanding New Verbal Capabilities in Children with Language Delays Language impairments affect 7% of preschool children (Ziegler, 2005). Some of these children will "catch up" to their...
Meaning in Behavioral Analysis
Introduction Understood variably, meaning is one of the most exalted concepts in human thought, writing, and discourse. Human life itself is discussed in terms of its meaning. Philosophy--one of the highest forms of intellectual enquiry--is defined...
Teaching Sign Language to a Nonvocal Child with Autism
Introduction Skinner first coined the terms mand, tact, and intraverbal in his 1957 book, Verbal Behavior. In this book, he defined a mand as "a verbal operant in which the response is reinforced by a characteristic consequence and is therefore...
Teaching Social Behavior to Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders Using Social Stories[TM]: Implications for School-Based Practice
Introduction Autism spectrum disorders (ASD), which include autism, Asperger's Syndrome (AS), and pervasive developmental disorder-not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS), are a group of disorders characterized by a host of difficulties with social interactions,...
The Contribution of Relational Frame Theory to the Development of Interventions for Impairments of Language and Cognition
Introduction: Behavior Analysis, Language and Stimulus Equivalence According to behaviour analysis, human language is verbal behaviour, emerging from the social contingencies operating in the verbal community. This perspective on cognitive functioning...
Using Relational Frame Theory to Build Grammar in Children with Autistic Spectrum Conditions
Introduction Autistic Spectrum Conditions (ASC) comprise a complex and diffuse set of behaviors which are essential for diagnosis, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical manual (DSM IV). Before the age of three years, the child will show delayed,...