Family Relations

Family Relations is a journal for family practitioners and academics on relationships across the life cycle with implications for intervention, education and public policy. It is published five times a year by the National Council on Family Relations. Editorial headquarters are in Blacksburg, Va. It has been in publication since 1951. Subjects covered include sociology, marriage and family.

Articles from Vol. 52, No. 4, October

Adult Children and Their Fathers: Relationship Changes 20 Years after Parental Divorce*
Adult children's reports of relationship changes with their fathers were examined 20 years after their parents' divorce. Data were drawn from interviews with 173 adult children from the Binuclear Family Study about their perceptions of their parents'...
Changing the Legacy of Divorce: Evidence from Prevention Programs and Future Directions*
This paper has two primary objectives. The first is to assess the current status of efforts to prevent mental health problems in children of divorce by highlighting the importance of using theory in the design and evaluation of prevention programs and...
Children's Adjustment Following Divorce: Risk and Resilience Perspectives
The empirical literature on the longer-term adjustment of children of divorce is reviewed from the perspective of (a) the stressors and elevated risks that divorce presents for children and (b) protective factors associated with better adjustment. The...
Controversies, Clarifications, and Consequences of Divorce's Legacy: Introduction to the Special Collection
Recent publications describing long-term results of longitudinal investigations of divorced couples have stirred controversies because of substantial differences in findings. The current Special Collection was initiated to clarify some of the issues...
Editorial
As a consumer of the scholarship and a researcher whose primary interest is marital transitions, I have eagerly awaited this Special Collection. When it was first proposed by Drs. Braver and Cookston, I saw this as an opportunity to bring together the...
Intimate Pathways: Changing Patterns in Close Personal Relationships across Time*
This paper presents findings from the Virginia Longitudinal Study of Divorce and Remarriage (VLSDR) describing diverse patterns of intimate relationships and personal adjustment in marriage and following divorce. Both a conflictual, unsatisfying marriage...
Listening to Children of Divorce: New Findings That Diverge from Wallerstein, Lewis, and Blakeslee*
I review new findings on (a) college students' perspectives on their living arrangements after their parents' divorces, (b) their relations with their parents as a function of their living arrangements, (c) their adjustment as a function of their parents'...
Payoffs and Pitfalls of Listening to Children
Children's perspectives can enlighten decisions regarding custody and parenting plans, but different opinions exist about how best to involve children in the decision-making process. This article discusses why most procedures for soliciting children's...
Radiating Messages: An International Perspective
Studies that radiated negative messages about the detrimental impacts of divorce on children prompted urgent calls in the United Kingdom for a reinstatement of traditional family values. A careful review of the evidence confirms that although the effects...
Reconciling Divergent Perspectives: Judith Wallerstein, Quantitative Family Research, and Children of Divorce
Although Judith Wallerstein's research on children with divorced parents has been influential, many quantitative family scholars have criticized her methods and conclusions. Wallerstein claims that children with divorced parents often reach adulthood...
The Social Construction of the Divorce "Problem": Morality, Child Victims, and the Politics of Gender
Although divorce rates have been stable or dropping for two decades, Americans seem anxious about the state of marriage. Drawing on the sociology of knowledge and a social constructionist approach to the study of social problems, we examine reasons for...