Political Research Quarterly

Articles from Vol. 50, No. 3, September

Civil Rights Roll-Call Voting in the House of Representatives, 1957-1991: A Systematic Analysis
The record of civil rights roll-call votes in the House of Representatives has yet to be systematically explained or predicted. In particular, it is not clear why House members sometimes appear to have a great deal of independence from constituency,...
Congressional Seat Swings: Revisiting Exposure in House Elections
Oppenheimer, Stimson, and Waterman's exposure thesis of partisan change contends that shifts in the partisan composition of Congress are related to the long-term stability of the electoral system. Applying their exposure model to elections from 1962-1994...
Creating a "Well Regulated Militia": Policy Responses to Paramilitary Groups in the American States
In a democratic political system responsive to citizen demands governments must often balance conflicting interests. The rise of armed rightwing paramilitary groups, and especially the recent growth of citizen militias, have created such a situation...
Executive Constraints and Success in International Crises
Crisis outcomes have traditionally been explained by the participating states' relative power and relative ability to demonstrate resolve. Resolve has almost always been defined as the willingness of a state to go to war to obtain a favorable settlement...
Explaining Federal Bureaucratic Compliance with Supreme Court Opinions
Past research on bureaucratic compliance with Supreme Court opinions offers few comprehensive theoretical frameworks and even fewer rigorous empirical tests. I argue that bureaucracies comply based on the costs or benefits of alternative ways of responding...
Fashionable Subjects: On Judith Butler and the Causal Idioms of Postmodern Feminist Theory
What conception of causality is presupposed when the discursive constitution of identity is affirmed? Is the subject of late modernity "Produced?" "Generated?" "Inscribed?" "Constructed?" "Defined?" "Formed?" Indiscriminately employed in much recent...
Implications of Political Expertise in Candidate Trait Evaluations
Candidate trait images have an important impact on global judgment. The present study addresses (1) which traits matter in candidate evaluations and (2) political expertise differences in trait-based evaluations. An unweighted version of the on-line...
"!Quedate O Vente!": Uncovering the Determinants of Hispanic Public Opinion toward Immigration
Why do some Hispanic-Americans support (Vente) and others oppose (Quedate) the liberalization of immigration policies?' In this study we attempt to ascertain which combination of demographic, attitudinal, and contextual factors determines Hispanic public...
The (Re)emergence of Regional Economic Integration in the Former Soviet Union
This study examines the consequences of the collapse of the unified Soviet market at the end of 1991, the dilemmas of choice generated by the economic and political costs and benefits of reintegration with different states, and the resulting attempts...
The Structure of Attitudes toward Groups: A Comparison of Experts and Novices
The study of mass opinion has recently focused increased attention on political sophistication and attitudes toward groups. Although the two topics are not directly related, they share a common concern: how does the mass public manage to form opinions...