Political Research Quarterly

Articles from Vol. 57, No. 2, June

Citizen Participation and the Neighborhood Context: A New Look at the Coproduction of Local Public Goods
In this article I examine citizen participation in the realm of local service delivery, addressing two fundamental questions. First, in what ways do individual- and neighborhood-level factors shape citizens' perceptions of crime and education as serious...
Constituency Diversity and Party Competition: A County and State Level Analysis
One of the staples of American politics is the theory that party competition is a function of constituency diversity. In Federalist #10 (see Rae and Taylor 1970: 7; Fiorina 1974: 89-119; Sullivan 1973) Madison emphasizes that increased constituency diversity...
Designing Tests of the Supreme Court and the Separation of Powers
While rational choice models of Supreme Court decisionmaking have enhanced our appreciation for the separation of powers built into the Madisonian Constitutional design, convincing empirical support lor a Separation-of-Powers (SOP) constraint on justices'...
Evolution in State Governance Structures: Unintended Consequences of State Tax and Expenditure Limitations
How did slate governments respond to constraints imposed by tax and expenditure limitations? We argue that the states' experiences with TELs help us understand an evolutionary dimension to political institutions and institutional change. We test if TEL...
Exploring Gender Differences in State Legislators' Policy Preferences
While a great deal of research documents women elected officials' more liberal policy attitudes and concludes that increased women's representation will produce more liberal policies, I argue that the influence of gender and ultimately the influence...
Funding Mechanisms and Policy Instruments: How Business Campaign Contributions Influence Congressional Votes
This study re-examines the influence of business campaign contributions on congressional voting behavior. We find that previous empirical work has not fully considered the distinct funding mechanisms campaign contributors use to channel funds to representatives...
Information Provision, Organizational Constraints, and the Decision to Submit an Amicus Curiae Brief in a U.S. Supreme Court Case
How do organized interests select the Supreme Court cases in which to file amicus curiae briefs? Starting with the assumption that organized interests pursue policy influence, I argue that an organized interest will submit amicus curiae briefs in the...
Legislative Representation in a Single-Member versus Multiple-Member District System: The Arizona State Legislature
Most research on legislative decisionmaking has focused on legislatures with single-member district systems, but much less is known about legislatures with multiple-member district systems. This study compares a multiple-member legislative chamber, the...
Mobilizing African-American Voters Using Direct Mail and Commercial Phone Banks: A Field Experiment
This essay summarizes the results of a large-scale randomized experiment conducted during the 2000 election campaign by the NAACP National Voter Fund, which sought to mobilize African-American voters. Focusing solely on the direct mail and phone banking...
Predicting the Presidential Presence: Explaining Presidential Midterm Elections Campaign Behavior
In this article we analyze the campaign behavior of presidents in the congressional midterm elections held between 1954 and 1998. We seek to identify those factors that influence a president's decision to visit a particular state during the midterm election...
Self-Selection Reconsidered: House Committee Assignment Requests and Constituency Characteristics
Distributive theory is perhaps the dominant paradigm for understanding committee organization and behavior in Congress. Central to distributive theory is the assertion that members will self-select to committees based on constituency related concerns;...
The Limitations of the Deracialization Concept in the 2001 Los Angeles Mayoral Election
In June 2001, Mexican American candidate Antonio Villaraigosa and white candidate James Hahn competed in the Los Angeles mayoral runoff election. Both were liberal Democrats seeking office in a political climate characterized by nonpartisan mayoral elections,...
The "Swing Voter" Revisited: Justice Anthony Kennedy and the First Amendment Right of Free Speech
The prevailing definition of a "swing voter" on the Supreme Court, set out in a landmark 1990 article in The Journal of Politics and unchallenged ever since, establishes an unreasonably high standard for determining whether a Justice truly fits that...
Tribal-State Relations Involving Land and Resources in the Self-Determination Era
This research focused on the nature of modern relationships between tribal and state governments in the land and natural resources arena. Surveys were completed by 49 states, the District of Columbia, and 77 tribal governments. The results indicated...