Political Research Quarterly

Articles from Vol. 63, No. 4, December

A New Measure of Group Influence in Presidential Elections: Assessing Latino Influence in 2008
AbstractThe importance of the Latino electorate has been the subject of both academic inquiry and media discourses. The question of Latino influence is frequently limited by an approach that focuses on single variable considerations (e.g., voter turnout...
Are Blacks and Latinos Responsible for the Passage of Proposition 8? Analyzing Voter Attitudes on California's Proposal to Ban Same-Sex Marriage in 2008
AbstractOn November 4, 2008, the majority of California's electorate supported a ban on same-sex marriage. Anecdotal evidence attributes its passage to increased turnout among black and Latino voters. This article determines whether this was so; it also...
Assessing the Impact of State Judicial Structures on Citizen Litigiousness
AbstractSome researchers argue over the existence of a "litigation explosion," while others seek to understand the causes of variation in citizen legal mobilization and rates of litigation among states. Existing studies have provided important insight...
Beyond Supply and Demand: A Feminist-Institutionalist Theory of Candidate Selection
AbstractDynamics of candidate selection are central to political representation. The dominant model used to study the case of women focuses on the supply of and demand for female aspirants. This article develops a critique of this approach, by drawing...
Cable News, Public Opinion, and the 2004 Party Conventions
AbstractIn this study, the authors test for the presence of bias during Fox News and CNN's coverage of the 2004 national party conventions. The content analysis demonstrates that Fox News's coverage was more favorable to the Republican Party than it...
Campaign Effects on the Accessibility of Party Identification
AbstractThis study uses response latency, the time required for a survey respondent to formulate an answer upon hearing a question, to examine the accessibility of partisan self-identifications over the course of a political campaign season. Although...
Candidate Gender and Voter Choice: Analysis from a Multimember Preferential Voting System
AbstractWomen are greatly underrepresented in elected office. A large literature on the subject has considerably advanced our understanding of this phenomenon, but many questions remain unanswered. Using original aggregate and individual-level data,...
Changing Lanes or Stuck in the Middle: Why Are Anocracies More Prone to Civil Wars?
AbstractPast research on regime type and civil war points to anocratic regimes as having a high probability of civil war onset. The specific characteristics of anocratic regimes that lead to their predisposition for civil war have been left unexplained....
Does Political Decentralization Exacerbate or Ameliorate Ethno-Political Mobilization? A Test of Contesting Propositions
AbstractThis article presents the results of an experiment that attempted the reconciliation of opposite expectations regarding the effectiveness of political decentralization on ethno-political mobilization. An agent-based model was run thousands of...
Exporting Air Pollution? Regulatory Enforcement and Environmental Free Riding in the United States
AbstractPolitical jurisdictions have incentives to promote pollution spillovers to capture the benefits of economic production within their borders while exporting the environmental costs to their neighbors. The authors examine the extent to which U.S....
Governors, Legislatures, and State Budgets across Time
AbstractPrior research by Abney and Lauth concluded that governors were losing ground to legislatures in shaping the state budget. Goodman examined Abney and Lauth's explanations for this change and found empirical support for some but not others. This...
Mini Symposium: Race and the 2008 Presidential Election
The Barack Obama "hope" poster was an iconic image of Obama's political campaign (Figure 1). A stencil portrait of Obama in red, white and blue had the words hope, change, or progress under the image of Obama. It was created and distributed widely on...
Obama and the White Vote
AbstractThis article draws on the racial threat thesis to test if white voters who lived in areas with larger African American populations were less receptive to Barack Obama in 2008. Racial context is found to structure white voters' evaluations of...
Political Integration through Ethnic or Nonethnic Voluntary Associations?
AbstractThis article challenges previous findings suggesting that ethnic associations promote political participation among immigrants. Analyzing recent survey data from Sweden, the authors find that political activity among immigrants is encouraged...
Race and Turnout: Does Descriptive Representation in State Legislatures Increase Minority Voting?
AbstractThe 2008 election marked an end to the longstanding gap in the level of black and white voter turnout, offering further evidence that minority empowerment affects voter turnout. In this article, the authors move beyond a dyadic conceptualization...
Serving Two Masters: Redistricting and Voting in the U.S. House of Representatives
AbstractThis article explores the consequences for representation after a redistricting by reexamining the finding that members of Congress will alter their voting behavior to fit their new district. Specifically, it applies partisan theories of congressional...
The Relationship between Defense Spending and Economic Growth in the United States
AbstractRecent increases in U.S. defense spending have renewed interest in the defense-growth nexus. The Feder-Ram-based models have traditionally been used in examining this relationship, but Dunn, Smith, and Willenbockel recommend the augmented Solow...
Voters, Emotions, and Race in 2008: Obama as the First Black President
AbstractSocial desirability effects make it difficult to learn voters' racial attitudes. List experiments can tap sensitive issues without directly asking respondents to express overt opinions. The authors report on such an experiment about Barack Obama...