Political Research Quarterly

Articles from Vol. 62, No. 3, September

Are All Precincts Created Equal? the Prevalence of Low-Quality Precincts in Low-Income and Minority Communities
More than forty years after passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, a fundamental question remains unanswered: although all citizens have an equal right to the ballot, do all citizens enjoy equal access to the ballot box? That is, are voting precincts...
Conditions for Competition in Low-Information Judicial Elections: The Case of Intermediate Appellate Court Elections
Although much work has examined the conditions for competition and incumbent defeat in high-visibility elections, scholars have conducted little research on these conditions for less visible offices. We look at one particular type of low-information...
Do Gender Stereotypes Transcend Party?
Voters hold stereotypes about candidate gender and candidate party. Yet little is known about the intersection of gender and party stereotypes. In this article, we investigate whether gender stereotypes transcend party. We consider whether gender stereotypes...
Federal Policy Activity and the Mobilization of State Lobbying Organizations
The mobilization of organized interests is affected not only by social and economic "supply" factors but also by government-related "demand" factors. The authors assess the impact of government activity on the mobilization of interests by examining how...
Is There a "Party" in Your Genes?
Utilizing quantitative genetic models, the authors examine the sources of party identification and the intensity of that identification. The results indicate genes exert little, if any, influence on party identification, directly or indirectly through...
James Madison's Psychology of Public Opinion
This article argues that in his "Party Press Essays," James Madison expounds a psychology of public opinion that is identifiable, but less developed, in his earlier writings. In these essays, Madison explains how a territorial mean, or a "practicable...
Living in a Battleground: Presidential Campaigns and Fundamental Predictors of Vote Choice
Little evidence links the strategic decisions of campaigns to individual-level voting behavior. Yet for campaigns to matter in the way that experts argue, exposure to campaigns must also matter, so there should be observable differences in the structure...
Meaning and Measurement: Reorienting the Race Politics Debate
Is race politics about racism, ideology, or group conflict? After decades, this debate seems scarcely closer to resolution, despite the enormous theoretical, empirical, and normative issues at stake. I argue that a misguided approach to interpreting...
Mutual Interests: The Case for Increasing Dialogue between Political Science and Neuroscience
Can neuroscientific techniques shed light on important questions in political science? The author argues for increased dialogue across disciplines as wide ranging as evolutionary psychology and biology, biological anthropology, behavioral economics,...
Policy Polarization among Party Elites and the Significance of Political Awareness in the Mass Public
This article analyzes opinions about abortion, racial, and social welfare policies, comparing their determinants among citizens with different levels of political information over the past several decades. Hypothesizing that growing elite partisan polarization...
Politics and an Innate Moral Sense: Scientific Evidence for an Old Theory?
Part of a symposium arguing for increased interdisciplinary conversations, this article suggests how political scientists can benefit from recent scientific work in child development, evolutionary biology, behavioral economics, primatology, and linguistics....
The Heritability of Partisan Attachment
One of the strongest regularities in the empirical political science literature is the well-known correlation in parent and child partisan behavior. Until recently, this phenomenon was thought to result solely from parental socialization, but new evidence...
The Human Dimension of Elections: How Poll Workers Shape Public Confidence in Elections
Voting technologies received considerable scrutiny after the 2000 election. However, the voter-poll worker interaction is also of critical importance. Poll workers exercise discretion and implement policies in ways that directly affect the voting experience....
The Importance of Race and Ethnicity in Congressional Primary Elections
Research regarding the electoral importance of race and ethnicity in congressional elections is limited by the overwhelming focus on general-election outcomes. This article seeks to extend this research by examining minority candidate emergence and electoral...
The Scientific Analysis of Politics: Important Contributions from Some Overlooked Sources
What are the best approaches and methodologies toward a scientific study of politics? During the professional lifetimes of most readers of Political Research Quarterly, that question has received a variety of answers, with the debate frequently generating...