Political Research Quarterly

Articles from Vol. 52, No. 3, September

Forcing Them to Be Free
Is it possible to force other states to be free by imposing democracy on them during military interventions? This article analyzes the historical relationship between U.S. military intervention and the democratization of target states from 1898-1992...
Health Reform in the States: A Model of State Small Group Health Insurance Market Reforms
For the fourth time since World War 11, national policymakers, in 1992, engaged in a major debate over reforming and regulating the U.S. health care system. One of the most debated issues involved the problem of the uninsured. While Congress and the...
Midterm Elections and Divided Government: An Information-Driven Theory of Electoral Volatility
Divided government affects individual choices over how to vote in midterm elections because it increases uncertainty in the minds of voters. Particularly, divided control of government makes blame attribution more difficult by obscuring causal connections...
Registration, Turnout, and State Party Systems
This study reexamines the influence of party elite liberalism on voter participation across the American states. Incorporating Hill and Leighley's measure of liberal party control, we offer a framework that places party elites as an important component...
State Legislators as Congressional Candidates: The Effects of Prior Experience on Legislative Recruitment and Fundraising
Prior research on congressional recruitment establishes that "experienced" or "quality" candidates compete more successfully for votes and money Little research, however, inquires into how type of prior experience affects strategic decisions on when...
State Policy Components of Interstate Migration in the United States
This article examines the effects of state policy on net interstate migration. Using Ordinary Least Squares regression on aggregate cross-sectional data, state policy factors are found to be significant determinants of the net interstate migration levels...
The Congressional Black Caucus and Vote Cohesion: Placing the Caucus within House Voting Patterns
Roll-call votes of African American representatives are explored to discern more explicitly the ideological cohesiveness of the Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) and factors that affect vote choice. We use adjusted Americans for Democratic Action (ADA)...
The Insignificance of Null Hypothesis Significance Testing
The current method of hypothesis testing in the social sciences is under intense criticism, yet most political scientists are unaware of the important issues being raised. Criticisms focus on the construction and interpretation of a procedure that has...
The Partisan Component to the Incumbency Advantage: 1956-1996
The power of incumbency in congressional elections is widely accepted. Is there a partisan component to the incumbency advantage? The theories of divided government push in two directions. Jacobson's argument would lead one to believe that the Democrats...