Political Research Quarterly

Articles from Vol. 56, No. 4, December

Agenda Setting in Congressional Elections: The Impact of Issues and Campaigns on Voting Behavior
Do issues matter? This article extends recent research on issue voting and campaign agenda-setting to voting decisions in congressional elections. We use a unique data set that includes information from a survey of candidates and campaign aides who competed...
Campaigns, Polls, and the States: Assessing the Accuracy of Statewide Presidential Trial-Heat Polls
Given the heavy reliance upon polls during election campaigns and the importance of state results in presidential election outcomes, this study examines the determinants of accuracy in statewide presidential trial-heat polls. Using Lau's (1994) examination...
Causes and Consequences of Public Attitudes toward Abortion: A Review and Research Agenda
This article provides a critical review of empirical research on attitudes toward abortion among mass publics in the United States, with a view toward suggesting promising avenues for future research. We identify three such themes: Accounting for pro-life...
Disentangling the Roles of Ideology and Issue Positions in the Rise of Third Parties: The Case of Argentina
This article examines why, in a system of high voter turnout, voters defect from traditional parties to third parties, and is especially focused on disentangling the roles of ideology and issue positions in voters' decision to switch allegiances. The...
Do Governors Matter? Budgeting Rules and the Politics of State Policymaking
Whether and how governors influence public policies in the U.S. is open to question. This research tests a model of gubernatorial influence on public policymaking in which gubernatorial power is conceived of the governor's power over the budgetary process...
Explaining Wars Fought by Established Democracies: Do Institutional Constraints Matter?
Extant research has shown that cross-national variations in the level of a country's democracy tend to be related to its propensity to be involved in external conflict. The dyadic version of the theory of democratic peace contends that democracies rarely,...
FDR to Clinton, Mueller to ?: A Field Essay on Presidential Approval
Since the 1930s, polling organizations have asked Americans whether they "approve or disapprove of the job [the incumbent] is doing as president." In the early 1970s, John Mueller started an academic industry by asking what drives these evaluations....
Feminist Organizational Structure in the White House: The Office of Women's Initiatives and Outreach
In 1995, President Clinton established the first formally organized office for women's issues in the Executive Office of the President (EOP): the Office of Womens Initiatives and Outreach (OWIO). The creation of the OWIO provides a unique opportunity...
Friends Don't Let Friends Vote for Free Trade: The Dynamics of the Labor PAC Punishment Strategy over PNTR
Studies of PAC contribution strategies tend to focus on the ways in which PACs seek to buy access to legislators or elect candidates friendly to their interests. What do PACs do when those to whom they have given large sums of money vote against their...
Multiple Theoretical Traditions in American Politics and Racial Policy Inequality
The American (national) political tradition emphasizes three major strands of thought (Smith 1993, 1997). Grasping the importance, interrelationships, and potential tensions of these multiple traditions is central to understanding American politics,...
Social Networks and Political Participation: The Role of Social Interaction in Explaining Political Participation
The argument advanced in this article is that interaction in social networks has a strong, though often overlooked, influence on the propensity to participate in politics. Specifically, I argue that social interaction creates opportunities for individuals...
StrategicVoting in Presidential Primaries: Problems of Explanation and Interpretation
This note uncovers a serious flaw in Abramson et al.'s (1992) influential application of expected utility theory to the study of strategic voting in U.S. presidential primaries. Due to this flaw, it is not clear what theory their positive empirical results...