Political Research Quarterly

Articles from Vol. 60, No. 2, June

A New Argument for Morality: Machiavelli and the Ancients
Machiavelli is best known for his bold realism, and The Prince is a self-conscious alternative to the moral teachings of Christian and classical thought. The author demonstrates, however, that most of Machiavelli's famous maxims are in fact derivative...
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A New Look at the Republican Advantage in Nonpartisan Elections
Conventional wisdom has long held that Republicans are advantaged when partisan labels are removed from the ballot. However, in this article, the authors argue that the advantage gained from nonpartisan elections favors the minority party because the...
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A Woman's Work Is Never Done? Fund-Raising Perception and Effort among Female State Legislative Candidates
The lack of female politicians has been attributed to a lack of female candidates for office. However, the reason why there are so few female candidates is not clear. The author examines whether differences in fund-raising perceptions and effort between...
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Black-Brown Coalitions in Local School Board Elections
As the racial composition of the United States becomes increasingly diverse, scholars have begun to examine whether interminority, or rainbow, coalitions are feasible. The power thesis suggests that lower levels of social distance between Anglos and...
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Descriptive Representation as a Mechanism to Mitigate Policy Backlash: Latino Incorporation and Welfare Policy in the American States
While the election of racial/ethnic minority lawmakers has diversified American legislative institutions, scholars continue to find evidence of racial backlash in public policy decisions. This seems to undermine the Madisonian conception of the ability...
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Diversity and Democracy
This issue of PRQ includes five articles addressing questions about minority status and democratic politics. Minorities identified by race, ethnicity, or sexual orientation fit uncomfortably into many liberal (pluralist) theories of democracy. Such theories...
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Ideology and Evaluation in an Experimental Setting: Comparing the Proximity and the Directional Models
The debate between which model, directional or proximity, better describes citizens' political behavior engages scholars because the former constitutes a serious challenge to long-standing, Downsian, spatial logic. Despite an engaging series of empirical...
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Institution Advocacy and the Political Behavior of Charter Schools
Scholars know that institutions such as corporations and nonprofits make up much of the lobbying community, yet there is no general theory as to why these organizations, which are not primarily established for advocacy, would ever choose to do it. By...
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Latino Attitudes toward Various Areas of Public Policy: The Importance of Acculturation
The growth of the Latino population and the increasing political importance of this group leads to questions about the potential political importance of this group. As such, it is important to gain a better understanding of political attitudes among...
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Lose, Win, or Draw? A Reexamination of Direct Democracy and Minority Rights
Researchers continue to disagree over how minority rights fare in direct democracy elections. The authors enter this debate by reviewing previous research and outlining more systematic criteria for assessing minority rights in the context of direct democracy....
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One More Piece to Make Us Puzzle: The Initiative Process and Legislators' Reelection Chances
This article examines how the presence and usage of the initiative process impact the electoral chances of state legislators. Using individual-level data on state legislators across the states from 1970 to 1989, the authors find that the presence and...
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Talk Leads to Recruitment: How Discussions about Politics and Current Events Increase Civic Participation
There is a positive relationship between how much we talk about politics and current events and how much we participate in civic activities. However, analytical biases make it difficult to accurately estimate the causal influence of talk on individual...
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The Policy Opportunities in Presidential Honeymoons
This article investigates the policy opportunities in presidential honeymoons. Specifically, after reviewing a standard (pivotal politics) model of lawmaking where presidents' election results are treated as exogenous, we develop a (honeymoon politics)...
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The Power of Decree: Presidential Use of Executive Proclamations, 1977-2005
Recent scholarship on unilateral presidential actions has recast our understanding of modern presidential policy making. However, our knowledge on this issue remains incomplete. In this article, the authors expand the literature on the unilateral presidency...
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The Third Face of Social Capital: How Membership in Voluntary Associations Improves Policy Accountability
This article examines whether political accountability-the heart of a functioning democracy-is enhanced by citizen participation in voluntary associations. The authors contend that involvement in associations offers an easy avenue for acquiring political...
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Western Political Science Association
WPSA March 2008 MeetingThe March 2008 meeting of the Western Political Science Association (WPSA) will be held at the Manchester Grand Hyatt hotel in San Diego, California. Andrea Simpson, University of Richmond, is serving as program chair for this...
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What Goes around, Comes Around: Race, Blowback, and the Louisiana Elections of 2002 and 2003
The authors contrast the 2002 Senate and 2003 gubernatorial runoffs in Louisiana, noting that the margin and the breadth of victory were greater for a gubernatorial candidate who enjoyed less political resources than her copartisan. The authors argue...
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