Political Research Quarterly

Articles from Vol. 62, No. 4, December

An Introduction to Crisp Set QCA, with a Comparison to Binary Logistic Regression
The authors focus on the dichotomous crisp set form of qualitative comparative analysis (QCA). The authors review basic set theoretic QCA methodology, including truth tables, solution formulas, and coverage and consistency measures and discuss how QCA...
Comparative Sources of Judicial Empowerment: Ideas and Interests
Since the end of World War II, courts across the globe have been increasingly involved in debates and decisions of national and international political import (Tate and Vallinder 1995; Russell and O'Brien 2001; Hirschl 2004, 2008). Judges have weighed...
Contentious Challenges and Government Responses in Latin America
This article examines how seven Latin American governments responded to 827 contentious political challenges. The research goes beyond most previous research by considering four governmental responses: concession, repression, toleration, and the combination...
Do Gender Quotas Foster Women's Political Engagement?: Lessons from Latin America
Gender quotas have been held to have more far-reaching consequences than increasing women's political representation. Some scholars claim that they foster women's overall political engagement. After elaborating a theoretical framework on how affirmative...
Getting to the Top: Career Paths of Women in Latin American Cabinets
Are presidential cabinets gendered institutions? This important question has been ignored for Latin America to date. In this article, the authors propose four benchmarks for evaluating whether presidential cabinets should be classified as gendered institutions....
In Pursuit of "Contemporary Civilization": Judicial Empowerment in Turkey
Turkey's powerful Constitutional Court serves as an administrative attaché of state elites in overseeing the political arena and transforming the society. Looking at the courts as administrative agents suggests that the ruling elite might turn to courts...
Interests, Ideas, and Institutions in Comparative Analysis of Judicial Power
In a high-profile 1993 publication about the status of scholarship titled "Public Law and Judicial Politics," Martin Shapiro wrote that "political science study of comparative constitutional law and courts has begun to flourish a little." He celebrated...
Judicial Reform in Mexico: Political Insurance or the Search for Political Legitimacy?
Judicial reform presents a paradox: What makes governing elites decide to grant power to an autonomous judiciary that will eventually curtail their own powers? The engagement of governing elites in judicial reforms is recently being explained as strategic...
Measuring Changes in American Party Reputations, 1939-2004
Scholars increasingly emphasize that party reputations are valuable electoral assets. The authors measure temporal change in the parties' relative reputations across several distinct policy areas and find that each party tends to have advantages on certain...
Postmaterialist Social Constituencies and Political Triggers: Explaining Bill of Rights Genesis in Internally Stable, Advanced Democracies
This article forwards a new postmaterialist trigger theory (PTT) of the origins of bills of rights in stable, advanced democracies. Socially, such projects are linked to the postmaterialist growth of "cultural left" forces such as civil libertarians...
The Consequences of Rivalry: Explaining Insurgent Violence Using Fuzzy Sets
The author presents a unique theory of insurgent group behavior using a fuzzy-set approach. In contrast to arguments that place the culpability of insurgent group violence toward noncombatants in the arena of natural resource endowments or the distinctive...
The Constituted Nature of Constituents' Interests: Historical and Ideational Factors in Judicial Empowerment
Through an analysis of constitutional transitions in one democratizing case (Spain 1978) and one authoritarian case (Chile 1980), this article argues that judicial empowerment can be accurately explained only through reference to the historical and ideational...
The Corruption-Enhancing Role of Re-Election Incentives? Counterintuitive Evidence from Brazil's Audit Reports
Traditional wisdom on the effect of re-election on incumbent performance is that first-term politicians refrain from rent extraction because they want to be re-elected. The authors find no evidence to support this belief. The corruptionreducing effects...
The Ideational Foundations of Israel's "Constitutional Revolution"
In the Israeli case, judicial empowerment has come primarily through judicial initiative rather than emerging from majoritarian institutions or strategic considerations relating to electoral politics. Justices with deep commitments to political-liberal...
The Realist Turn in Comparative Constitutional Politics
The past few decades have seen sweeping global convergence to democracy, real or professed, alongside convergence to constitutional supremacy and a corresponding increase in the political salience of constitutional courts worldwide. Elsewhere, I have...
Tocqueville as Critical Race Theorist: Whiteness as Property, Interest Convergence, and the Limits of Jacksonian Democracy
This article demonstrates that there are affinities between Tocqueville's commentary on race and race relations in Democracy in America and the core assumptions of the critical race theory movement. Tocqueville shares with critical race theorists the...
Where We Came From: Defining the Western Political Science Association: A Brief, Very Selective Organizational History Sampled from the Archives of the WPSA
The history of the formation and early years of the Western Political Science Association (WPSA) has been well documented by G. Homer Durham, the founding President of the WPSA in his June 1956 Western Political Quarterly article, "The WPSA: The First...