Political Research Quarterly

Articles from Vol. 54, No. 1, March

Explaining Japanese Aid Policy in Latin America: A Test of Competing Theories
This article attempts to explain the variation in Japanese official development assistance in eighteen Latin American countries for the period 1979 to 1993. The findings suggest that recipient need and some Japanese economic interests have influenced...
Information and Political Engagement in America: The Search for Effects of Information Technology at the Individual Level
Some aspects of democracy appear more sensitive than others to the availability throughout society of political information. Individual-level political engagement poses a puzzle in this regard. An instrumental-- quantitative conception of information...
Modeling Regional Effects on State Policy Diffusion
Generations of state politics scholars have believed that a U.S. state is more likely to adopt a law if its neighboring states have already done so, that is, that there is a positive regional effect on policy diffusion. But rarely has the social learning...
PAC Contributions and Lobbying Contacts in Congressional Committees
Researchers and political observers often assume that campaign contributions help political action committees (PACs) and their affiliated lobbyists gain access to members of Congress. But empirical studies demonstrating that contributions purchase access...
Party Polarization and Legislative Gridlock
This article investigates how parties affect legislative gridlock-the inability of government to enact significant proposals on the policy agenda. Conventional accounts suggest that divided party control of government causes such stalemate. I offer an...
Presidential Agenda Setting in Foreign Policy
The traditional model of agenda setting places the Presidency as the primary agenda setter in American politics, particularly in foreign policy. Recent challenges to the traditional model argue that the President's foreign policy agenda is inherently...
Race and the Representation of Blacks' Interests during Reconstruction
Race and the Representation of Blacks' Interests During Reconstruction A majority of recent studies finds that black members of Congress are more supportive of blacks' interests than are white members of Congress, even white Democrats. These results...
Race, Roll Calls, and Redistricting: The Impact of Race-Based Redistricting on Congressional Roll-Call
The congressional redistricting following the 1990 Census resulted in the creation of a number of majority-minority congressional districts. While the descriptive representation of various minority groups in the U.S. House was increased as a result,...
Teams without Uniforms: The Nonpartisan Ballot in State and Local Elections
The use of a nonpartisan ballot was one of the many Progressive reforms introduced around the turn of the century that is still heavily used today. The intent of the change to a nonpartisan format was, and still is, to remove party cues from a voter's...
The Electoral Fortunes of Women Candidates for Congress
Many hypotheses have been proposed to explain why women remain underrepresented in Congress. One of those hypotheses is that some voters have blatant prejudices against women politicians, while others hold stereotypes about men and women politicians...
The "Gender Gap" in State Legislative Representation: New Data to Tackle an Old Question
Explanations regarding the gender gap in state legislative representation have centered on attitudinal, institutional, and situational characteristics of states (e.g., Carroll 1994; Nechemias 1987; Norrander and Wilcox 1998; Rule 1981, 1990; Welch 1977)....