Political Research Quarterly

Articles from Vol. 58, No. 2, June

A Natural Experiment of Race-Based and Issue Voting: The 2001 City of Los Angeles Elections
The theory of racially polarized voting suggests that race is a primary determinant of vote choice in elections where a minority candidate is pitted against a white candidate. The spatial model of voting suggests that voters consider the issue positions...
A New Measure of Party Strength
In order to measure the strength of the parties in each state, the Major Party Index (MPI) was built by averaging the results of the six major elections that take place in the fifty states. This index allows us to describe the absolute and comparative...
Between Justice and Legality: Derrida on Decision
Recent critiques of Jacques Derrida have misunderstood his contribution to political theory and dismiss his work as apolitical or nihilistic. In contrast to this trend, I argue that Derrida's concept of decision is the most explicitly political moment...
Beyond the Roll-Call Arena: The Determinants of Position Taking in Congress
Most analyses of position taking in Congress focus on roll-call voting, where members of Congress (MCs) regularly cast votes, thereby regularly taking positions. Left largely unstudied has been position taking beyond the domain of rollcall voting. However,...
Bill Sponsorship and Congressional Support for Policy Proposals, from Introduction to Enactment or Disappearance
Research on policy change tends to focus on legislative successes (bills that are enacted), policies that are especially important or controversial, and the final stages of the policy process. This article attempts to show how to improve our ability...
Competing Constraints: State Court Responses to Supreme Court Decisions and Legislation on Wages and Hours
This article examines state supreme court implementation of Supreme Court precedent when deciding cases challenging state legislation. While previous research provides a wealth of insight into how state contextual and institutional features constrain...
Constituency Size and Incumbent Safety: A Reexamination
Existing literature suggests that, if anything, larger constituencies make reelection more challenging for legislative incumbents. Yet theoretical arguments commonly are unclear about why more populous constituencies should disadvantage incumbents relative...
Good Money and Bad Money: Do Funding Sources Affect Electoral Outcomes?
There is lively public debate about the normative impact of different kinds of money in elections. However, there is surprisingly little examination of the practical impact that funding sources have on election outcomes. Even if we assume that voters...
The Consolidation of the White Southern Congressional Vote
This article explores the initial desertion and continued realignment of about one-sixth of the white voters in the South who, until 1994, stood by Democratic congressional candidates even as they voted for Republican presidential nominees. Prior to...
The Political Economy of Simultaneous Transitions: An Empirical Test of Two Models
Traditional political economy emphasizes the difficulty of conducting simultaneous transitions toward market economy and democratic government. There are two major theories that seek to explain why some reform programs are never fully implemented or...
The Politics of Presidential Agendas
Past research holds that if presidents are to increase their success in Congress, they must set the policy agenda in their favor. But what determines the propensity of presidents to propose or support different policies? Because presidents influence...
The Rise of Partisanship and the Expansion of Partisan Conflict within the American Electorate
Recent research has outlined important changes in partisanship among political elites in the United States. Specifically, the effect of partisanship on politicians' vote choice and other political behavior has risen, and the number of issue areas where...
The Supreme Court and Opinion Content: The Use of the Federalist Papers
Many scholars of the Supreme Court and many justices assert the importance of the Federalist Papers. They provide important evidence of original meaning and interpretation of the Constitution, and there is evidence that there is an increase in citations...
Why Do People Accept Public Policies They Oppose? Testing Legitimacy Theory with a Survey-Based Experiment
The orthodox answer to the question posed in the title of this article is that the legitimacy of institutions has something to do with acquiescence to unwelcome public policy decisions. We investigate that conventional wisdom using an experiment embedded...