Political Research Quarterly

Articles from Vol. 64, No. 3, September

Announcements
Western Political Science Association2012 Western Political Science Association MeetingThe 2012 meeting of the Western Political Science Association will be held at the Marriott Waterfront in Portland, Oregon, from March 22 to 24. Peregrine Schwartz-Shea,...
Contradictory Calculi: Differences in Individuals' Turnout Decisions across Electoral Systems
AbstractExisting theories of turnout model individuals' decisions to vote as a function of the utility they would gain from their favored party's election, the costs of voting, and the intrinsic benefits associated with democratic participation. This...
Democratization and the Middle Class in China: The Middle Class's Attitudes toward Democracy
AbstractDo the middle classes in authoritarian, late-developing countries support democratization? Among scholars, there seems no clear consensus on this question. To fill this gap, this article examines the case of the middle class in China, based on...
Distrusting Democrats and Political Participation in New Democracies: Lessons from Chile
AbstractDistrusting democrats seek accountability and advocate reform in established democracies. Do they behave similarly in new democracies? Using AmericasBarometer survey data, cluster analysis identifies five profiles of democratic support in Chile:...
Does the Party Matter? Endorsements in Congressional Primaries
AbstractResearch suggests that endorsements should affect outcomes in low-information elections such as primaries, but that hypothesis has not yet been tested empirically. Based on a survey of 2002 congressional campaigns, this article describes the...
Does What Happens in Los Mochis Stay in Los Mochis? Explaining Postmigration Political Behavior
AbstractThis article seeks to understand how immigrants' premigration political socialization experiences shape their views of the new polity, the extent to which this imported socialization affects their degree of postmigration political engagement,...
How Citizens and Their Legislators Prioritize Spheres of Representation
AbstractThe authors uncover evidence that citizens' priorities about various spheres of legislative representation differ across demographic groups and that these differences are subsequently reflected in the in-office behavior of their elected officials....
How Good Is Good Enough? A Multidimensional, Best-Possible Standard for Research Design
AbstractRecent years have seen a shift in methodological emphasis from the observable properties of a sample to its unobservable properties, that is, judgments about the process by which the data were generated. Considerations of research design have...
Industry Strength and Immigrant Policy in the American States
AbstractDespite the negative rhetoric surrounding the immigration issue, recent policy in many states has provided significant benefits to both legal and undocumented immigrants. Previous scholarship on state-level immigrant policy suggests that differences...
Making Rules about Rulemaking: A Comparison of Presidential and Parliamentary Systems
AbstractThe authors examine the administrative procedures acts (APAs) of separation of powers and parliamentary systems. They examine sixteen national APAs (thirteen parliamentary and three presidential) and forty-eight APAs from the U.S. states that...
Measuring Case Salience in State Courts of Last Resort
AbstractScholars recognize that both citizens and elites may alter their behavior in response to salient stimuli. Epstein and Segal's (2000) measure of salience for the United States Supreme Court provided a valid and reproducible way to assess the political...
Piety and Redistributive Preferences in the Muslim World
AbstractThis article tests two competing theories of the relationship between piety and redistributive preferences in the Muslim world. The first, drawn from the new political economy of religion, holds that more pious individuals of any faith should...
Protest and Democracy in Latin America's Market Era
AbstractExisting studies hold that Latin America's market turn has had a demobilizing effect on collective political activity despite the presence of democracy. However, recent work has documented the revival of protest in the region, emphasizing the...
Spanish-Language Radio Advertisements and Latino Voter Turnout in the 2006 Congressional Elections: Field Experimental Evidence
AbstractBecause Hispanic voters are seldom targeted for campaign communication and because they listen to radio at higher rates than non-Hispanics, Spanish-language radio represents an attractive venue for testing whether nonpartisan mass media messages...
Strategic Vote Choice in One-Round and Two-Round Elections: An Experimental Study
AbstractThe authors test a model of strategic vote choice in which the decision to support or not to support a candidate depends on the benefit associated with the election of a given candidate and the candidate's perceived viability. They test the model...
The Effects of Judicial Campaign Activity on the Legitimacy of Courts: A Survey-Based Experiment
AbstractThe purpose of this article is to investigate the consequences of judicial campaign activity for the perceived legitimacy of the Pennsylvania judiciary. The authors find that politicized campaign ads do detract from court support, although they...
Transaction Cost, Exchange Embeddedness, and Interlocal Cooperation in Local Public Goods Supply
AbstractThe authors develop and test an integrated framework for understanding how transaction cost and exchange embeddedness contribute to the general problems of institutional collection action, contracting, and cooperation. An application of the framework...
When the President Goes Public: The Consequences of Communication Mode for Opinion Change across Issue Types and Groups
AbstractEvidence is mounting that presidents find difficulty in leading public opinion. However, focusing on presidential ability to lead mass opinion may underestimate the degree to which presidents are able to rally key groups on political and personal...