Humanities

Bimonthly magazine providing review of notable humanities projects and developments.

Articles from Vol. 20, No. 4, July/August

12 Projects from NEH Will Share in Money for "America's Treasures"
TWELVE PROJECTS submitted by the National Endowment for the Humanities are among sixty-two that will share in $30 million in matching funds in a White House initiative to "Save America's Treasures." The money is designated for cultural collections and...
Read preview Overview
A Civil Education
still picture my folks to this day, just standing there crying, and I was missing them.... my grandfather, tears coming out of his eyes. I got on the train and I don't even know who was on the train because my mind was so full of unhappiness and sadness....
Read preview Overview
A Peopled Wilderness
LADIES, EVEN INVALIDS, CAN PENETRATE THE wilderness for scores of miles without making any exertion which a healthy child of five years cannot safely and easily put forth," wrote Rev. WH.H. Murray in 1869. Murray may have greatly exaggerated the accessibility...
Read preview Overview
Around the Nation: State by State
Alabama Free residential institutes for humanities school teachers in Alabama are offered this summer as part of the ongoing SUPER program (School and University Partners for Educational Renewal). "Teaching the Literatures and Cultures of Major World...
Read preview Overview
A Sense of Place
Every year forty-three million Americans pull up stakes and move on. The search for something better dates back to the earliest days of the country, from Indians traversing the Great Plains to find more buffalo, to immigrants crossing the Appalachians...
Read preview Overview
A Sense of Place: William R. Ferris Talks with David Hackett Fischer
The National Endowment for the Humanties has begun a new initiative on regionalism. In this issue, Chairman William R. Ferris talks with historian David Hackett Fischer of Brandeis University about the role regionalism has played in defining America...
Read preview Overview
A Valley Divided
WHEN AMERICAN HISTORIANS SPEAK of "region," we have generally talked of the big regions: New England, Midwest, and Mid-Atlantic; South, West, and Far West. We have talked of Frederick Jackson Turner and Sinclair Lewis, W. J. Cash and Nathaniel Hawthorne....
Read preview Overview
Celebrating Ernest Hemingway's Century 100
ERNEST HEMINGWAY, who once said all writers are liars, stode across the face of the century with simple declarative sentence and a tough attitude. He would have been a hundred years old on July 21, 1999. In the course of an extraordinary life, he wrote...
Read preview Overview
He Said, She Said
In the early 1830s, George and Arvilla Smith set off from Vermont with their little son for the wilds of Michigan, impelled by a stern Calvinist faith to be missionaries to the Ottawa Indians. We can only marvel at the hardship and sorrow they endured...
Read preview Overview
Low Blows and High Rhetoric
As the camera moves in closer and closer on the girl's face, an atomic bomb explodes and we see a reflection of a mushroom cloud in the child's eyes. The Television screen fills with the image of a little girl picking off and counting the petals of a...
Read preview Overview
NEH to Fund New Regional Centers
"Sense of place gives us equilibrium," notes writer Eudora Welty. The study of "place" has always been one of the tasks of the humanities. Part of Americans' sense ot place comes from the regions in which they live. Enduring traditions, cultural attitudes,...
Read preview Overview
Stephen F Austin: Empresario of Texas
IN A JULY MORNING IN 1821, SIXTEEN MEN ON horseback paused at the east bank of the Sabine River. Behind them lay Louisiana, the most southwestern state of the United States. When the horses scrambled up the muddy bank on the opposite side of the river,...
Read preview Overview
Ten Things about the West
Why do I see a region where others saw only another interchangeable part of a homogenized nation-state? Over the years I have sorted out my "top ten" reasons for treating the West as a region, defining it with flexible borders at the Pacific and at the...
Read preview Overview
The Myth of New England
NEW ENGLAND would seem to be the perfect American region. Its history is long, and mostly it is proud. As early as 1614, even before the place was settled by Puritans, Captain John Smith gave New England its name, and his term quickly took hold. For...
Read preview Overview
Where Settlers and Sioux Collided: A Bozeman Retrospective
IN 1861 A GEORGIA ADVENTURER named John Bozeman headed for the newly opened Montana goldfields, finding a shorter route northwest of the well-worn Overland Trail in the process. The trail was to become known as the "bloody Bozeman" as miners, settlers,...
Read preview Overview