Humanities

Bimonthly magazine providing review of notable humanities projects and developments.

Articles from Vol. 22, No. 2, March/April

A Conversation with Arthur Miller
PLAYWRIGHT ARTHUR MILLER HAS BEEN SELECTED AS THIS YEAR'S Jefferson Lecturer, the highest honor the federal government bestows in the humanities. Miller, who has written thirty plays, among them Death of a Salesman and The Crucible, talked recently with...
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A Mardi Gras for the Mind
The motto of the Rocky Mountain Book Festival in Denver is "Culture pops, shines, and sparkles." "It's so exciting-like an intellectual buffet," says Christiane Citron. "You can spend the whole day listening to poetry if you want to, or meeting mystery...
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An Administrator at Heart: Charles Bickford
When Charles Bickford's time is divided between teaching and administration, administration usually wins out. Not that he doesn't enjoy teaching, which he often does in less traditional places-he and his wife, a photographer, just returned from a stint...
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An Eye for the Modern: The World of Alfred Stieglitz
In the early 1920s Alfred Stieglitz displayed a series of cloud photographs, titled Equivalents. "All of my photographs are equivalents of my basic philosophy of life," he wrote. "All art is but a picture of certain basic relationships; an equivalent...
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A Struggle for Identity: The American Deaf Community
When Gallaudet University took on the task of creating an exhibition on deaf America a little more than a decade ago, the initial concept was to show the distinct culture that has evolved within the population of American deaf people. Some of the "culturally...
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Editor's Note
ARTHUR MILLER The headline on that February morning in 1949 read: "A GREAT PLAY IS BORN." It was the newest work by the promising young playwright, Arthur Miller. The play was Death of a Salesman, and, following as it did on the success of All My Sons,...
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In His Own Words
All my Sons THE KELLERS' BACKYARD. KELLER. Listen, you do like I did and you'll be all right. The day I come home, I got out of my car;-but not in front of the house ... on the corner You should've been here, Annie, and you too, Chris; you'd-a seen something....
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Louisiana Endownment Acquires a New Home
In Turners Hall's early days, visitors toasted newlyweds, cheered somersaulting gymnasts, and debated the hot political issues of the day. The New Orleans hall, built in 1868 by the Turnergemeinde Society, was meant to serve as a social meeting place...
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New Faces at Council
MAKING THEIR FIRST APPEARANCE AT THE NATIONAL COUNCIL ON THE HUMANITIES IN MARCH ARE NINE MEMBERS WHO WERE APPOINTED DURING THE CONGRESSIONAL RECESS. THE COUNCIL IS THE TWENTY-SIX-MEMBER ADVISORY GROUP THAT MAKES FUNDING AND POLICY RECOMMENDATIONS TO...
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One Site: A Hospital's Story
It was the place black patients went when they didn't want to be treated in a basement, and the first Norfolk hospital to have its own ambulance. Norfolk Community Hospital closed in 1998 in the face of increasing integration and rising health costs....
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Other Mahler, Other Schumanns: Women Composers Get a Hearing of Their Own
At the age of eleven, Clara Schumann published her first musical composition. By sixteen, she was playing the piano under the direction of Mendelsohn and was known throughout Europe for her talents. In fact, her musical expertise spread the popularity...
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State by State
A Roundup of Activities Sponsored by State Humanities Councils ARIZONA The Phoenix Museum of History opens its spring exhibition, "Getting around the Valley: Transportation in Early Phoenix," on March 31. The exhibition documents the history of transportation...
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The Playwright: Living in the Present Tense
SITTING ATOP A MANHATTAN APARTMENT BUILDING IN A COMMUNITY GARDEN LUSH with flowers marked the beginning of a relationship with Arthur Miller that opened my eyes and heart to a vista of possibilities I had not imagined. Now, we all know that Arthur Miller...
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The Poet: Chronicler of the Age
Arthur Miller once observed that in America a poet is seen as being "like a barber trying to erect a skyscraper." He is, in other words, regarded as being "of no consequence." Miller is so often praised, and occasionally decried, for what is taken to...
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What's on Stage? A Roundup of NEH-Supported Projects on Playwrights
THE DRAMATIC VISION OF AUGUST WILSON by Sandra Shannon Using poetry, the blues, and Romare Bearden's art, August Wilson fuses elements of African American culture into his dramatic biography of African Americans. Of his projected cycle of ten plays,...
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