Humanities

Bimonthly magazine providing review of notable humanities projects and developments.

Articles from Vol. 24, No. 1, January/February

Around the Nation
ROUNDUP OF ACTIVITIES SPONSORED BY THE STATE HUMANITIES COUNCILS ARIZONA "Talking Birds, Feathered Serpents, and Painted Women: Casas Grandes Ceramics" will continue at the Tucson Museum of Arts through February 16. The exhibition highlights the pottery...
D.C. Takes to the Airwaves
SCHOLARS IN WASHINGTON, D.C., are taking to the airwaves to bring the humanities into the community. "How do you educate your community? That is a challenge," says E. Ethelbert Miller, a poet, scholar, and host of a one-hour interview show, Humanities...
Donald Simmons of South Dakota
AROUND THE NATION While following Lewis and Clark's trail along the Missouri River, Donald Simmons canoed, cooked buffalo meat, and traveled the same distance the Great Expedition covered in a three-day period. "I really enjoy reading the journals of...
Editor's Note: Of History and Memory
"In times of crisis," writes NEH Chairman Bruce Cole, "the humanities and the arts are often praised as sources of consolation, comfort, expression, and insight, but rarely seen as essential, or even high priorities. But they are much more than that....
History in a Democratic Age
HISTORIAN JOHN LUKACS TALKS WITH NEH CHAIRMAN BRUCE COLE ABOUT HISTORY AND ITS HEROES. LUKACS HAS WRITTEN A DOZEN BOOKS, AMONG THEM HISTORICAL CONSCIOUSNESS, THE PASSING OF THE MODERN AGE, AND FIVE DAYS IN LONDON, MAY 1940. HIS MOST RECENT IS CHURCHILL:...
"In the Beginning There Was No Holocaust"
IN THE SPRING OF 1945, THE WORLD TRIED TO IGNORE the gruesome images of the Nazi concentration camps as they were liberated by Allied troops. "In the beginning there was no Holocaust," writes historian Raul Hilberg. "When it took place in the middle...
Lives of Famous Men: The Lost Frescoes
SCHOLAR ON THE TRAIL OF Petrarch has discovered two rare books containing hand-drawn images that offer a glimpse of the lost fourteenth-century frescoes from the Hall of Famous Men. The frescoes, destroyed by fire, were commissioned to accompany Petrarch's...
Partners of the Heart
The surgeon stood over the tiny baby, poised to try a new life-saving technique on her heart. He had not yet had a chance to practice on an animal, but the baby's situation was acute. He turned to Vivien Thomas, an African American lab assistant who...
Strange Alliances: The Deerfield Raid of 1704
On a cold February night in 1704, two hundred and forty French and Indian troops attacked the town of Deerfield, Massachusetts, the northwesternmost settlement of the New England colonies. The raiding party swept through the village, killing residents,...
The Amazing Adding Subtracting Composing Creating Do-Everything Machine
Ada Lovelace Envisions Modern Computing ADA LOVELACE WAS A SCIENTIST AND A COUNTESS. Her passion for mathematics was unfettered by the popular view that women had frail brains that could be injured by serious work in mathematics. Her interests ranged...
The Trial of a Young Nation
February marks the bicentennial of Chief Justice John Marshall's precedent-setting decision that established the power of the Supreme Court to declare an act of Congress unconstitutional. Marbury v. Madison enjoys the status of a landmark, perhaps the...
We the People: The Urgency of Memory
THE WHITE HOUSE WILL HOST NEH'S FIRST ANNUAL "HEROES OF HISTORY" lecture this February, with historian Robert V. Remini speaking. The same evening, scholarships will be awarded to five high school juniors for their prize-winning essays on "The Idea of...
Witness to War
The First World War produced casualties and nightmarish battles that were unprecedented: Russia, France, Germany, and Austria-Hungary each lost more than a million soldiers, and the British just under a million. In one offensive, the four-month Battle...